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Here's what I'm trying to do -- this is pseudo code and doesn't work. Does anyone know how to accomplish this for reals:

// Define the class
MyClass = Class.extend({});

// Store the class name in a string
var classNameString = 'MyClass';

// Instantiate the object using the class name string
var myObject = new classNameString();
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5 Answers 5

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Would it work if you did something like this:

var myObject = window[classNameString];

..?

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That worked. peirix you are awesome. You think it's cross-browser compatible? –  Kirk Sep 2 '09 at 6:39
1  
Think you meant window[classNameString] (no quotes). Breaks as soon as MyClass is moved to a lower (i.e. function) scope. @kirk: yes this is cross-browser. –  Crescent Fresh Sep 2 '09 at 7:17
    
How do you pass arguments to the constructor using this method? –  James McMahon Sep 4 '12 at 20:17
1  
@JamesMcMahon In that case you'd have to use window[classNameString](args). But as Crescent Fresh mentions, be careful, as this might break in some cases. –  peirix Sep 5 '12 at 8:47
    
@peirix That's great! Any idea if I can do that with classes loaded with requirejs?? –  Reno Feb 13 '13 at 15:21

Here's a more robust solution that will work with namespaced functions:

var stringToFunction = function(str) {
  var arr = str.split(".");

  var fn = (window || this);
  for (var i = 0, len = arr.length; i < len; i++) {
    fn = fn[arr[i]];
  }

  if (typeof fn !== "function") {
    throw new Error("function not found");
  }

  return  fn;
};

Example:

my = {};
my.namespaced = {};
(my.namespaced.MyClass = function() {
  console.log("constructed");
}).prototype = {
  do: function() {
    console.log("doing");
  }
};

var MyClass = stringToFunction("my.namespaced.MyClass");
var instance = new MyClass();
instance.do();
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that's the best. you can use it in any case. thanks Yuriy. –  Fabio Beoni Jun 5 '12 at 14:20
    
Why (windows || this), isn't window always going to be defined? –  James McMahon Sep 6 '12 at 15:54
2  
@JamesMcMahon: The world as we know is no longer the reality. Tenants like nodejs have also come to occupy our planet! :) –  Mrchief May 6 '13 at 20:33

If MyClass is global, you can access it as a property of window object (assuming your code runs in a browser) using subscript notation.

var myObject = new window["MyClass"]();
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BTW: window is the reference to the global Object in browser JavaScript. Which is also this, and should work even in non-browser environments if you are in the global scope.

var obj = new this[classNameString]();

However, there really is no reason to use a string. JavaScript functions are themselves objects, just like strings which are objects also.

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5  
It's only this if called from a global context. window works regardless of the context you are in, so I see no reason to prefer this over window. –  chaiguy Oct 18 '11 at 16:55

Here is improved version of Yuriy's method that also handles objects.

var stringToObject = function(str, type) {
    type = type || "object";  // can pass "function"
    var arr = str.split(".");

    var fn = (window || this);
    for (var i = 0, len = arr.length; i < len; i++) {
        fn = fn[arr[i]];
    }
    if (typeof fn !== type) {
        throw new Error(type +" not found: " + str);
    }

    return  fn;
};
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