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In an effort to eke out some cmov instructions on an intel core 2 running windows 7 pro I wrote the code below. All it does is take a string from the console as input, apply some shift operations to generate a random seed, and then pass that seed on to srand, for the generation of a small array of pseudorandom numbers. The pseudorandom numbers are then evaluated for whether they satisfy the predicate function ( more arbitrary bitshuffling ), and output a '*' or a '_'. The purpose of the experiment is to generate cmov instructions, but as you can see in the disassembly below, there are none.

Any tips on how to change the code or the cflags so that they'll be generated?

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>

bool blackBoxPredicate( const unsigned int& ubref ) {
   return ((ubref << 6) ^ (ubref >> 2) ^ (~ubref << 2)) % 15 == 0;
}

int main() {
   const unsigned int NUM_RINTS = 32;
   unsigned int randomSeed = 1;
   unsigned int popCount = 0;
   unsigned int * rintArray = new unsigned int[NUM_RINTS];
   std::string userString;

   std::cout << "input a string to use as a random seed: ";
   std::cin >> userString;

   std::for_each( 
      userString.begin(), 
      userString.end(), 
      [&randomSeed] (char c) {
         randomSeed = (randomSeed * c) ^ (randomSeed << (c % 7));
   });

   std::cout << "seed computed: " << randomSeed << std::endl;

   srand(randomSeed);

   for( int i = 0; i < NUM_RINTS; ++i ) {
      rintArray[i] = static_cast<unsigned int> (rand());
      bool pr = blackBoxPredicate(rintArray[i]);
      popCount = (pr) ? (popCount+1) : (popCount);

      std::cout << ((pr) ? ('*') : ('_')) << " ";
   }

   std::cout << std::endl;

   delete rintArray;
   return 0;
}

And used this makefile to build it:

OUT=cmov_test.exe
ASM_OUT=cmov_test.asm
OBJ_OUT=cmov_test.obj
SRC=cmov_test.cpp
THIS=makefile

CXXFLAGS=/nologo /EHsc /arch:SSE2 /Ox /W3

$(OUT): $(SRC) $(THIS)
   cl $(SRC) $(CXXFLAGS) /FAscu /Fo$(OBJ_OUT) /Fa$(ASM_OUT) /Fe$(OUT)

clean:
   erase $(OUT) $(ASM_OUT) $(OBJ_OUT)

And yet when I went to see whether any had been generated, I saw that microsoft's compilers had generated the following assembly for that last for loop:

; 34   :       popCount = (pr) ? (popCount+1) : (popCount);
; 35   :       
; 36   :       std::cout << ((pr) ? ('*') : ('_')) << " ";

  00145 68 00 00 00 00   push    OFFSET $SG30347
  0014a 85 d2        test    edx, edx
  0014c 0f 94 c0     sete    al
  0014f f6 d8        neg     al
  00151 1a c0        sbb     al, al
  00153 24 cb        and     al, -53            ; ffffffcbH
  00155 04 5f        add     al, 95         ; 0000005fH
  00157 0f b6 d0     movzx   edx, al
  0015a 52       push    edx
  0015b 68 00 00 00 00   push    OFFSET ?cout@std@@3V?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@1@A ; std::cout
  00160 e8 00 00 00 00   call    ??$?6U?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@YAAAV?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@0@AAV10@D@Z ; std::operator<<<std::char_traits<char> >
  00165 83 c4 08     add     esp, 8
  00168 50       push    eax
  00169 e8 00 00 00 00   call    ??$?6U?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@YAAAV?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@0@AAV10@PBD@Z ; std::operator<<<std::char_traits<char> >
  0016e 46       inc     esi
  0016f 83 c4 08     add     esp, 8
  00172 83 fe 20     cmp     esi, 32            ; 00000020H
  00175 72 a9        jb  SHORT $LL3@main

For your reference, here are my cpu id strings and compiler version.

PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE=x86
PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER=x86 Family 6 Model 58 Stepping 9, GenuineIntel
PROCESSOR_LEVEL=6
PROCESSOR_REVISION=3a09

Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 16.00.40219.01 for 80x86
share|improve this question
4  
If you want particular instructions, don't try to get the compiler to infer them as what it will do is subject to change with version, optimization settings, flags, etc. Instead, use whatever inline assembly capability applies to that compiler, or link a genuine assembly language source file into the result. –  Chris Stratton Dec 1 '12 at 16:30
    
under what conditions do optimizing c++ compilers normally generate cmov instructions? this is more of an experiment than for production use; I'd like to know how to write c++ that is easy for compilers to optimize for increasing branch prediction performance. –  Max DeLiso Dec 1 '12 at 16:54
2  
It used to be that cmov was slower than cmp+jmp if the branch was highly predictable, so compilers would be right to not use it often. Also, cmov created dependencies that cause it to run slower in a tight loop. I'm not sure if this is still the case. Maybe using PGO would encourage the compiler to do so by helping find mis-predicted branches? –  Cory Nelson Dec 1 '12 at 17:23
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