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I know the comparison operator of PHP is not 100% because of the automatic type declarations.

I did some tests and found this code

<?php
function foo($answer) {
    if ($answer > 10) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return $answer;
    }
}
if (foo(11)) {
    echo "11 is bigger than 10<br />";
}        
if (foo(9)) {
    echo "9 is bigger than 10<br />";
}
?>

The output is:

11 is bigger than 10 9 is bigger than 10

Can someone explain me where and why the code fails in this comparison.

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closed as too localized by PeeHaa, obi NullPoiиteя kenobi, tereško, Michael Berkowski, MarcinJuraszek Dec 2 '12 at 10:18

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Search a bit more, before declaring a bug. You could however, if this was a more complex problem. –  Tyymo Dec 1 '12 at 18:10
    
Just read about booleans as you treat the return value as one: php.net/boolean –  hakre Dec 2 '12 at 13:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Function foo() always returns some value. In this case both boolean and int type. Just make sure you are more strictly when you compare returned value.

<?php
function foo($answer) {
    if ($answer > 10) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return $answer;
    }
}

if (foo(11) === true) {
   // This returned TRUE 
   echo "11 is bigger than 10<br />";
}

if ( is_int(foo(9)) === true ) {
   //This returned int 
   echo "9 is bigger than 10<br />";
}
?>
share|improve this answer

Because return $answer is truthy in both of your test cases.

This evaluates to:

if (11) { ...
if (9) { ...
share|improve this answer

You can do this,

<?php
function foo($answer) {
    return ($answer > 10);
}

if (foo(11)) {
    echo "11 is bigger than 10<br />";
}        
if (foo(9)) {
    echo "9 is bigger than 10<br />";
}
?>
share|improve this answer

You are comparing it wrong way, $answer is non zero value and in PHP when you use it in condition every non zero value is consider to be true.

function foo($answer) {
    if ($answer > 10) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Or, better, return ($answer > 10); –  cHao Dec 1 '12 at 18:09
    
You didn't like my edit? @pan –  PeeHaa Dec 1 '12 at 18:10
    
@PeeHaa: C'mon; you have to know that was hideous. :) We should be encouraging fixing the return value, not duct-taping it. –  cHao Dec 1 '12 at 18:11
    
Oh. I'm all for same return types :) –  PeeHaa Dec 1 '12 at 18:11

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