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I know that this was answered many times, but I just cant figure out what is wrong.

I have a structure

typedef struct zaznam{
   char kategoria[53];
   char znacka[53];
   char predajca[103];
   double cena;
   int rok;
   char stav[203];
   struct zaznam *next;
   }ZAZNAM;

And i want to delete first node this way.

for(prev = act = prvy; act!=NULL; prev=act, act=act->next){
    if((strstr(act->znacka,vyber)!=NULL)){

    if(act->znacka==prvy->znacka){ 
    //if "znacka" of the actual node is equal to the first

        prev=prvy->next; //in "previous" is pointer to the second node
        free((void *)act); //free first node
        prvy=prev; //first node = previous 
    }
    else{ //this works
        prev->next=act->next;
        free((void *)act);
        act=prev;
    }

And it works for everything but not for the first node.

Thanks for help

share|improve this question
    
Isn't act->znacka==prvy->znacka comparing the pointers, thus equivalent to comparing the struct address itself? I.e. shouldn't you use strcmp or the like? –  xtofl Dec 1 '12 at 18:31
    
Well, it should compare two strings for example in act->znacka is word "one" and in prvy->znacka is "one" it will work. I tried it with printf, and it prints what it should print. –  hoci kto Dec 1 '12 at 18:35
    
It doesn't work for e.g. char x[2] ={'a,',0}; char y[2]={'a',0}; assert(x==y); It compares pointers. –  xtofl Dec 1 '12 at 18:37
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Looks to me like when you delete the first node you're not properly assigning prev to point to the next node when you continue on the next iteration of the for-loop. For instance, in your first if statement to check if you're at the first node, you do the following:

prev=prvy->next; //in "previous" is pointer to the second node
free((void *)act); //free first node
prvy=prev; //first node = previous

That does free the first node, but, immediately in your for-loop you then assign act to prev here:

for(prev = act = prvy; act!=NULL; prev=act, act=act->next)

Since freeing memory doesn't actually erase the contents of memory, you proceed down the rest of the list as if the first node had not been freed. Actually using a freed pointer like that is undefined behavior, so anything could happen (i.e. you could crash, etc. ... in this case it seems like you aren't).

Try changing your code to the following:

for(prev = act = prvy; act!=NULL;)
{
    if((strstr(act->znacka,vyber)!=NULL))
    {
        if(act==prvy)
        { 
            //we're at the first node
            ZAZNAM* temp=act->next; 
            free((void *)act); //free first node
            prev=act=prvy=temp; //re-establish starting condition
        }
        else
        {   
            prev->next=act->next;
            free((void *)act);
            act=prev->next;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        //iterate here because if you delete the first node, you don't want
        //to start iterating like would happen if you kept iteration in the
        //for-loop declaration
        prev=act;
        act=act->next;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So I used another variable called pom,(*pom, pom=prvy->next) and I used it instead of prev but it is still not working. I also changed if to if(strcmp(act->znacka, prvy->znacka) == 0) now it looks like this pom=prvy->next if (strcmp(act->znacka, prvy->znacka) == 0){ free((void *)act); act=pom; –  hoci kto Dec 1 '12 at 18:47
    
Jason: Yes it deletes everything it should delete. i tried it many times –  hoci kto Dec 1 '12 at 18:51
    
Are you attempting to delete a single node or all the nodes in the list? It seems like it's all the nodes in the list ... –  Jason Dec 1 '12 at 18:52
    
Yes all the nodes, actually its something like list of cars, and if I want to delete for example cars "Honda" and Hyundai i will just write part of it name for example "nda" and it will delete them –  hoci kto Dec 1 '12 at 18:54
    
Sounds like you only want to delete select nodes, not all the nodes ... is that correct? –  Jason Dec 1 '12 at 18:56
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Well, you violate your own invariant prev->next == act already in the beginning: for (prev = act = prvy;... Second, this act->znacka==prvy->znacka should be act==prvy to find out whether you are at the beginning of the chain, otherwise it confuses people.

And I would probably try to reestablish you starting (but wrong) invariant (which is act==prev) by adding act=prev; for the first case. Maybe it will work.

share|improve this answer
    
By invariant, I mean en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loop_invariant –  zkar Dec 1 '12 at 19:05
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