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I usually use traits for implementing strategies (some action that requires no accompanying fields). Recently I've discovered that same functionality may be defined in terms of objects. They may be directly extending Function trait or extends some trait that defines special methods aside from apply()

Example Code:

/* strategy realization via traits */
package object Traitness {
  trait Strategy {
    def performAction() : Unit = ()
  }
  abstract class Usage {_ : Strategy =>
  def doWork() =
    this.performAction()
  }

  // defining strategies
  trait SayA extends Strategy {
    override def performAction() = {
      println("A")
      super.performAction()
    }
  }

  trait SayB extends Strategy {
    override def performAction() = {
      println("B")
      super.performAction()
    }
  }

  trait SayC extends Strategy {
    override def performAction() = {
      println("C")
      super.performAction()
    }
  }

  //using strategies
  class SimpleStrategy extends Usage with SayA
  def reverseOrder() = new Usage with SayC with SayA
  object fullUsage extends Usage with SayA with SayB with SayC

  //run-time checking
  val check1 : Boolean = (new SimpleStrategy).isInstanceOf[SayB]
  val check2 : Boolean = reverseOrder().isInstanceOf[SayB]
  val check3 : Boolean = fullUsage.isInstanceOf[SayB]

  //compile-time checking
  def proclaim(x : SayB) = println("SayB")
}

/* strategy realization via function objects */
package object Valueness {
  trait Strategy extends Function0[Unit]

  class Usage(val strategies : List[Strategy]) {
    def doWork() = for (s <- strategies)
      s()
  }

  //defining strategies
  object SayA extends Strategy {
    override def apply() = {
      println("A")
    }
  }

  object SayB extends Strategy {
    override def apply() = {
      println("B")
    }
  }

  object SayC extends Strategy {
    override def apply() = {
      println("C")
    }
  }

  //using strategies
  class SimpleStrategy extends Usage(SayA :: Nil)
  def reverseOrder() = new Usage(SayB :: SayA :: Nil)
  val fullUsage = new Usage(SayA :: SayB :: SayC :: Nil)

  //run-time checking
  def check(strategy : Strategy, usage : Usage) = usage.strategies contains strategy
  val check1 : Boolean = check(SayB, new SimpleStrategy)
  val check2 : Boolean = check(SayB, reverseOrder())
  val check3 : Boolean = check(SayB, fullUsage)

  //no compile-time checking available
}

Which one should I choose?

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This is very similar to composition (proxy'ing to objects that handle different strategies) vs. inheritance (mixing in traits which implement different strategies) .. I do not think that either is inherently "best" (or "preferable") and different situations may be suited to different .. strategies. –  user166390 Dec 1 '12 at 18:37
    
Using self types is not mandatory. I may mix strategies and include them in Usage as a class member of type Strategy. –  ayvango Dec 1 '12 at 18:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the use case you describe, using either traits or objects is unnecessary object-oriented overkill. Your strategies are simply functions, and can be implemented most cleanly as such.

object Strategy{

  type Strategy = () => Unit

  val sayA:Strategy = ()=>{println("A")}
  val sayB:Strategy = ()=>{println("B")}
  val sayC:Strategy = ()=>{println("C")}
}

Creating a subclass of Function0[Unit] here just doesn't buy you anything, and costs you the ability to make trivial literals. Functions are perfectly good entities in Scala. Get comfortable with them, and don't hesitate to use them directly.

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1  
Sometimes I need to have three functions in strategy: start, process, finish. It's rather simplified example. Creating sublass of Function0[Unit] gives me abilities for type cheking in compile time (such as assigning different types for different physical variables) –  ayvango Dec 1 '12 at 19:51
    
Given that, I'm still not sure what you get by subclassing Function0, since your strategy objects aren't really anything like functions. –  Dave Griffith Dec 1 '12 at 23:10
class MyStrategy {
  val sayABC: Strategy.Strategy = () => {
    Strategy.sayA()
    Strategy.sayB()
    Strategy.sayC()
  }
}
reflect.runtime.universe.typeOf[MyStrategy].members.filter(_.asTerm.fullName.endsWith(".sayABC")).head

The result:

res36: reflect.runtime.universe.Symbol = value sayABC

In a case if my function sayABC only consists of calls to different functions, it would be nice if someone show us how to get those calls to sayA, sayB, sayC via AST?

... it's intended to be a well-formatted answer to Dave Griffith's code

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