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It's my first working on a quite big project, and I've been asked to obtain the best performances.

So I've thouhgt to replace my for loops with a ListIterator, because I've got around 180 loops which call list.get(i) on lists with about 5000 elements.

So I've got two questions.

1) Are those 2 snippets equal? I mean, do them produce the same output? If no, how can I correct the ListIterator thing?

ListIterator<Corsa> ridesIterator = rides.listIterator();
    while (ridesIterator.hasNext()) {
        ridesIterator.next();
        Corsa previous = ridesIterator.previous(); //rides.get(i-1)
        Corsa current = ridesIterator.next(); //rides.get(i)
        if (current.getOP() < d.getFFP() && previous.getOA() > d.getIP() && current.wait(previous) > DP) {
            doSomething();
            break;
        }
    }

__

for (int i = 1; i < rides.size(); i++) {
    if (rides.get(i).getOP() < d.getFP() && rides.get(i - 1).getOA() > d.getIP() && rides.get(i).getOP() - rides.get(i - 1).getOA() > DP) {
        doSomething();
            break;
        }
    }

2) How will it be the first snippet if I've got something like this? (changed i and its exit condition)

for (int i = 0; i < rides.size() - 1; i++) {
    if (rides.get(i).getOP() < d.getFP() && rides.get(i + 1).getOA() > d.getIP() && rides.get(i).getOP() - rides.get(i + 1).getOA() > DP) {
        doSomething();
            break;
        }
    }

I'm asking because it's the first time that I'm using a ListIterator and I can't try it now!

EDIT: I'm not using an ArrayList, it's a custom List based on a LinkedList

EDIT 2 : I'm adding some more infos. I can't use a caching system because my data is changing on evry iteration and managing the cache would be hard as I'd have to deal with inconsistent data. I can't even merge some of this loops into one big loop, as I've got them on different methods because they need to do a lot of different things.

So, sticking on this particular case, what do you think is the best pratice? Is ListIterator the best way to deal with my case? And how can I use the ListIterator if my for loop works between 0 and size-1 ?

share|improve this question
    
Sidenote: rides.get(i-1) will throw exception for first element, approach with iterators will do the same. Plus, code with iterator will throw exception for last element in the list on line with ridesIterator.next(). –  Victor Sorokin Dec 1 '12 at 19:43
    
My mistake, the second for should have rides.get(i+1) instead of rides.get(i-1). Fixed –  StepTNT Dec 1 '12 at 19:45
1  
If rides is an instance of ArrayList, then rides.get(i) will finish in O(1). In this case, your transformation will be unlikely to make the program significantly faster. –  reprogrammer Dec 1 '12 at 19:50
1  
Generally, if you use ArrayList as implementation of List, get(i) will be as fast as using iterator. Using iterator is suitable if you want to remove elements while iterating over collection or you want to use ListIterator or if you use LinkedList. –  Victor Sorokin Dec 1 '12 at 19:50

3 Answers 3

If you know the maximum size, you will get the best performance if you resign from collections such as ArrayList replacing them with simple arrays.

So instead creating ArrayList<Corsa> with 5000 elements, do Corsa[] rides = new Corsa[5000]. Instead of hard-coding 5000 use it as final static int MAX_RIDES = 5000 for example, to avoid magic number in the code. Then iterate with normal for, referring to rides[i].

Generally if you look for performance, you should code in Java, as if it was C/C++ (of course where you can). The code is not so object-oriented and beautiful, but it's fast. Remember to do optimization always in the end, when you are sure, you have found a bottleneck. Otherwise, your efforts are futile, only making the code less readable and maintainable. Also use a profiler, to make sure your changes are in fact upgrades, not downgrades.

Another downside of using ListIterator is that it internally allocates memory. So GC (Garbage Collector) will awake more often, which also can have impact on the overall performance.

share|improve this answer
    
I've edited my first post as I can't use an ArrayList. I like your solution, but I don't know the maximum size of the list, so I can't go on this way! Nice suggestion though! –  StepTNT Dec 2 '12 at 10:34
    
@StepTNT Don't use ArrayList, use normal Java arrays. You said in your post "lists with about 5000 elements", so you can set a maximum to for example 10000 elements, allocate such big array once (you don't have to use all the allocated space) and then be happy with the speed. –  Adam Stelmaszczyk Dec 2 '12 at 14:15
    
I know, but that's the size of the data that I'm working on for the moment. I don't know if it will have an upper bound or something, and I can't even set it to a fixed value because this software will be sold and limiting the size of the list is not the best thing to do. As a sidenote, this list has to be sorted evertime that I insert something, so I can't just use anything based on an array because it would make everything quite hard. –  StepTNT Dec 2 '12 at 19:31
  1. No they do not do the same.

    while (ridesIterator.hasNext()) {
      ridesIterator.next();
      Corsa previous = ridesIterator.previous(); //rides.get(i-1)
      Corsa current = ridesIterator.next(); //rides.get(i)
    

    The variables previous and current would contain the same "Corsa" value, see the ListIterator documentation for details (iterators are "in between" positions).

    The correct code would look as follows:

    while (ridesIterator.hasNext()) {
      Corsa previous = ridesIterator.next(); //rides.get(i-1)
      if(!ridesIterator.hasNext())
        break; // We are already at the last element
      Corsa current = ridesIterator.next(); //rides.get(i)
      ridesIterator.previous(); // going back 1, to start correctly next time
    
  2. The code would actually look exactly the same, only the interpretation (as shown in the comments) would be different:

    while (ridesIterator.hasNext()) {
      Corsa previous = ridesIterator.next(); //rides.get(i)
      if(!ridesIterator.hasNext())
        break; // We are already at the last element
      Corsa current = ridesIterator.next(); //rides.get(i+1)
      ridesIterator.previous(); // going back 1, to start correctly next time
    

From a (premature?) optimization viewpoint the ListIterator implementation is better.

  • LinkedList is a doubly-linked list which means that each element links to both its predecessor (previous) as well as its successor (next). So it does 3 referals per loop. => 3*N
  • Each get(i) needs to go through all previous elements to get to the i index position. So on average N/4 referals per loop. (You'd think N/2, but LinkedList starts from the beginning or the end of the list.) => 2 * N * N/4 == N^2 /2
share|improve this answer

Here are some suggestions, hopefully one or two will be applicable to your situation.

  1. Try to do only one rides.get(x) per loop.
  2. Cache method results in local variables as appropriate for your code.

In some cases the compiler can optimize multiple calls to the same thing doing it just once instead, but not always for many subtle reasons. As a programmer, if you know for a fact that these should deliver the same values, then cache them in local variables.

For example,

int sz = rides.size ();
float dFP = d.getFP ();  // wasn't sure of the type, so just called if float..
float dIP = d.getIP ();
Corsa lastRide = rides.get ( 0 );
for ( int i = 1; i < sz; i++ ) {
    Corsa = rides.get ( i );
    float rOP = r.getOP ();
    if ( rOP < dFP ) {
        float lastRideOA = lastRide.getOA (); // only get OA if rOP < dFP
        if ( lastRideOA > dIP && rOP - lastRideOA > DP ) {
            doSomething ();
            // maybe break;
        }
    }
    lastRide = r;
}

These are optimizations that may not work in all cases. For example, if your doSomething expands the list, then you need to recompute sz, or maybe go back to doing rides.size() each iteration. These optimizations also assumes that the list is stable in that the elements don't change during the get..()'s. If doSomething makes changes to the list, then you'd need to cache less. Hopefully you get the idea. You can apply some of these techniques to the iterator form of the loop as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. I know that I've missed some informations in my question, so I'm adding them now. Actually, there's no way to add a caching system because each of this for (more than 180!) is doing something like heuristic optimization techniques, and so the data il changing in every iteration! That's why I can't even do everything in the same loop, because I need to finish one loop, check if my new solution is better than the previous, and then move on the next one! –  StepTNT Dec 2 '12 at 10:38

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