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Sometimes you throw multiple browsers into a function to debug. I know you can exit the whole shebang with Q but what if you want to exit the second browser (see below's code) and return to the first level of browser? I've heard type c but that doesn't exit the second level browser.

FUN <- function() {
browser()                      #first one
    lapply(1:10, function(x) {
browser()                      #second one
        return(x)
    })
}

FUN()
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1  
I add qwer (or something else) right after the second browser. I then manually flip through code and when I want to exit the second browser, I just press c. It throws an error that object qwer does not exist, but I'm already out, have my pants on and on my way home. :) –  Roman Luštrik Dec 1 '12 at 23:02
    
This is actually genius and it's like tricking R. flodel gives the responsible approach but this is likely what I'll do. I think you should post this as an answer. –  Tyler Rinker Dec 2 '12 at 1:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I agree with Josh and would like to suggest these two alternatives to your current code:

1) debugonce: If we call foo your inner function, then debugonce(foo) will launch the debugger only the first time that foo is called, when x==1.

FUN <- function() {
  browser()
  foo <- function(x)return(x)
  debugonce(foo)
  lapply(1:10, foo)
}

2) debug and undebug. After you run debug(foo), the debugger will be launched every time foo is called, and until you run undebug(foo):

FUN <- function() {
  browser()
  foo <- function(x)return(x)
  debug(foo)
  lapply(1:10, foo)
}

When you want to stop debugging foo, type undebug(foo) before hitting c and it will take you back to the first level browser.

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Very thorough and thoughtful answer. Didn't know about these functions. Thank you. +1 –  Tyler Rinker Dec 2 '12 at 1:19
    
+1 There's also browserSetDebug, which lets you move up the call stack during a browser session. However, it doesn't seem to work right when the function launching the browser session is called from within lapply. –  Matthew Plourde Dec 2 '12 at 1:29
    
I'm not sure I get what the condition argument is for. At first I thought it might be like the expr argument to browser, determining whether or not the browser's invoked, but it's not... –  Matthew Plourde Dec 2 '12 at 1:32
    
Same here, @MatthewPlourde, the condition option is not what I thought it was, so I removed my mention of it. –  flodel Dec 2 '12 at 2:07

Typing c does exit the current browser context.

Your code, though, executes one "first level" and 10 distinct "second-level" browser calls during its execution. As a result, when you exit one second-level browser, you're almost immediately thrown into the next one, so it may appear that typing c doesn't work.

Type c <RETURN> 11 times to confirm that this is what's happening.

> FUN()
Called from: FUN()
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[1L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[2L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[3L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[4L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[5L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[6L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[7L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[8L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[9L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
Called from: FUN(1:10[[10L]], ...)
Browse[1]> c
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I add qwer (or some other object that does not exist) right after the second browser. I then manually flip through code and when I want to exit the second browser, I just press c. It throws an error that object does not exist. You will be thrown back to the first browser call.

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THIS is a great trick –  Ricardo Saporta Oct 22 '13 at 15:44
    
@RicardoSaporta -- I don't understand this trick, and wish I did. Where does the qwer go, and how does it allow you to escape the sequence of inside-the-loop browser calls when and only when you'd like to? –  Josh O'Brien Oct 22 '13 at 16:04
    
@JoshO'Brien, I used: lapply(seq(100), function(i) {browser(); quer}) It will not allow you to get through more than one iteration (if calling in an iterative context, of course). But it will kick you back just a single context level –  Ricardo Saporta Oct 22 '13 at 16:13
    
@RicardoSaporta -- Thanks. That makes sense. –  Josh O'Brien Oct 22 '13 at 16:34

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