Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Input: a list of lines

Output: a list of list of lines, which is the input list split at (sequences of one or more) empty lines.

This is the least ugly solution I have so far:

split_at_empty(lines):
    paragraphs = []
    p = []
    def flush():
        if p:
            paragraphs.append(p)
        p = []
    for l in lines:
        if l:
            p.append(l)
        else:
            flush()
    flush()
    return paragraphs

There must be a better solution (perhaps even functional)! Anyone?

Sample input list:

['','2','3','','5','6','7','8','','','11']

Output:

[['2','3'],['5','6','7','8'],['11']]
share|improve this question
2  
Post a sample of your input list. – Burhan Khalid Dec 1 '12 at 20:13
    
@Jo So Your "solution" doesn't work: local p in flush() is responsible of UnboundLocalError: local variable 'p' referenced before assignment. That's not serious – eyquem Dec 1 '12 at 20:32
    
@eyquem. My bad. Was too much in a JavaScript mood. To have it work, we must make it even a bit uglier. – Jo So Dec 1 '12 at 20:48
    
@Jo So OK, you are a fair guy – eyquem Dec 1 '12 at 21:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted
import re

ss =  '''Princess Maria Amelia of Brazil (1831–1853)


was the daughter of Dom Pedro I,
founder of Brazil's independence and its first emperor,

and Amelie of Leuchtenberg.



The only child from her father's second marriage,
Maria Amelia was born in France
following Pedro I's 1831 abdication in favor of his son Dom Pedro II.

Before Maria Amelia was a month old, Pedro I left for Portugal
to restore its crown to his eldest daughter Dona Maria II.
He defeated his brother Miguel I (who had usurped Maria II's throne),
only to die a few months later of tuberculosis.


'''

def select_lines(input,regx = re.compile('((?:^.+\n)+)',re.MULTILINE)):
    return [x.splitlines() for x in regx.findall(input)]

for sl in  select_lines(ss):
    print sl
    print

result

['Princess Maria Amelia of Brazil (1831\x961853)']

['was the daughter of Dom Pedro I,', "founder of Brazil's independence and its first emperor,"]

['and Amelie of Leuchtenberg.']

["The only child from her father's second marriage,", 'Maria Amelia was born in France', "following Pedro I's 1831 abdication in favor of his son Dom Pedro II."]

['Before Maria Amelia was a month old, Pedro I left for Portugal', 'to restore its crown to his eldest daughter Dona Maria II.', "He defeated his brother Miguel I (who had usurped Maria II's throne),", 'only to die a few months later of tuberculosis.']

[['2', '3'], ['5', '6', '7', '8'], ['11']]

Another way, to act on lists:

li = [ '', '2', '3', '', '5', '6', '7', '8', '', '', '11']

lo = ['5055','','','2','54','87','','1','2','5','8','','']

lu = ['AAAAA','BB','','HU','JU','GU']

def selines(L):
    ye = []
    for x in L:
        if x:
            ye.append(x)
        elif ye:
            yield ye ; ye = []
    if ye:
        yield ye



for lx in (li,lo,lu):
    print lx
    print list(selines(lx))
    print

result

['', '2', '3', '', '5', '6', '7', '8', '', '', '11']
[['2', '3'], ['5', '6', '7', '8'], ['11']]

['5055', '', '', '2', '54', '87', '', '1', '2', '5', '8', '', '']
[['5055'], ['2', '54', '87'], ['1', '2', '5', '8']]

['AAAAA', 'BB', '', 'HU', 'JU', 'GU']
[['AAAAA', 'BB'], ['HU', 'JU', 'GU']]
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe that's the best one! Using generators makes it cleaner, thanks. – Jo So Dec 1 '12 at 20:58
    
Just wondering...why is ye a param, rather than a local? – cHao Dec 1 '12 at 21:27
    
This is now way to long and clumsy to be an accepted answer. Please edit it to be short and concise and you'll get back the accept :) – Jo So Dec 1 '12 at 23:26
    
@Jo So Hello, I've considered your remark closely. I corrected the above code 2 days ago. Today I've also corrected other answers of mine. Because you're right, I tend to write too long answers. And I even deleted the comments I had written just here above, there's no interest to encumber stackoverflow's memories with these useless remarks of mine. Thank you to have pointed my flaw, I will remind that – eyquem Dec 4 '12 at 14:04
    
@eyquem: Well done! :) – Jo So Dec 4 '12 at 14:25

A bit less ugly than the original:

def split_at_empty(lines):
    r = [[]]
    for l in lines:
        if l:
            r[-1].append(l)
        else:
            r.append([])
    return [l for l in r if l]

(The last line gets rid of empty lists that would otherwise be added.)

share|improve this answer
    
Not bad, really! and the overhead is ok. – Jo So Dec 1 '12 at 21:20
    
I rather like the simplicity of this one. Only issue is if the input list is huge. – cHao Dec 1 '12 at 21:23

And for list comprehension obsessives...

def split_at_empty(L):
    return [L[start:end+1] for start, end in zip(
        [n for n in xrange(len(L)) if L[n] and (n == 0 or not L[n-1])],
        [n for n in xrange(len(L)) if L[n] and (n+1 == len(L) or not L[n+1])]
        )]

or better

def split_at_empty(lines):
    L = [i for i, a in enumerate(lines) if not a]
    return [lines[s + 1:e] for s, e in zip([-1] + L, L + [len(lines)]) 
            if e > s + 1]
share|improve this answer
    
The first one is wrong unfortunately. The second one is nice but doesn't play nice with list generators. – Jo So Dec 2 '12 at 15:09
    
both work for me with the original sample input (and others). What input list are you using? – Stuart Dec 2 '12 at 15:15
    
Sorry, you are right, but it's a little confusing to have L and lines with different indices. Also, easier to read L[n] and not L[n+1] than L[n] != '' and L[n + 1] == ''. – Jo So Dec 2 '12 at 15:27
    
(Maybe you want to except my changes) – Jo So Dec 2 '12 at 15:40
    
thanks, changes accepted – Stuart Dec 2 '12 at 15:56

You could combine the list into a string and then resplit it:

>>> a = ['', '2', '3', '', '5', '6', '7', '8', '', '', '11']
>>> [x.strip().split(' ') for x in ' '.join(a).split('  ')]
[['2', '3'], ['5', '6', '7', '8'], ['11']]

And you should probably use a regex to catch any amount of whitespace (I added another one before the '11' here):

>>> import re
>>> pat = re.compile(r'\s{2,}')
>>> a = ['', '2', '3', '', '5', '6', '7', '8', '', '', '', '11']
>>> [x.strip().split(' ') for x in pat.split(' '.join(a))]
[['2', '3'], ['5', '6', '7', '8'], ['11']]
share|improve this answer

Here is a generator-based solution:

def split_at_empty(lines):
   sep = [0] + [i for (i,l) in enumerate(lines) if not l] + [len(lines)]
   for start, end in zip(sep[:-1], sep[1:]):
      if start + 1 < end:
         yield lines[start+1:end]

For your input:

l = ['' , '2' , '3' , '' , '5' , '6' , '7' , '8' , '' , '' , '11']
for para in split_at_empty(l):
   print para

it yields

['2', '3']
['5', '6', '7', '8']
['11']
share|improve this answer
1  
I had thought of this one, but don't you think it's a bit complicated and has too much overhead and long lines for the sole benefit of having few lines? – Jo So Dec 1 '12 at 20:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.