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I have a pretty exotic problem, since I am trying to create some sort of a compiler... I want to pass a lambda expression to a templated function like this:

    template<class T>
delegate<T>* bind(std::function<T> func)
{
    return nullptr;
}

So that I can now call

bind([&](int a) { // do something });

... So normally, this wouldn't be a problem, since std::function is able to capture a lambda. But here the problem is that (let's assume) I don't know or don't want to provide the info about what "T" is exactly. It could be any function signature you could also insert into std::function<>...

I also need to pass this "inferred" signature back to the "delegate" class I want to return and that delegate class needs to be a pointer to class...

For now I have come up with this:

template<class T>
struct delegate : public std::function<T>
{
    delegate(const std::function<T>& func) : std::function<T>(func) { }
    delegate(const delegate<T>& func) { }
};

template<class T>
delegate<T>* bind(std::function<T>&& func)
{
    return new delegate<T>(std::forward<std::function<T>>(func));
}

But the above example of a call to "bind" fails with "failed template argument deduction". How can I get this to work without having to specify the "T" parameter explicitly when calling "bind" (then it works, at least)?

Since in theory my compiler has all the info to workaround this issue, I could just insert the instance of "T", but this would make the generated code unnecessarily convoluted.

BTW, I am using the lastest Clang compiler.


Here is the final solution:

    template<typename T> struct get_signature;
template<typename Mem, typename Ret, typename... Args> struct get_signature<Ret(Mem::*)(Args...) const> {
    typedef Ret type(Args...);
};

template<class T> 
delegate<typename get_signature<decltype(&T::operator())>::type>* bind(T func)
{
    return nullptr;
}

Be aware that you may need to adjust the "const" modifiers to your needs.

share|improve this question
4  
It's not a wise idea to inherit from std::function. I'll bet you it doesn't have a virtual destructor. –  chris Dec 1 '12 at 20:23
    
There was something wrong with passing std::function as a parameter, but I don't remember what exactly. –  Bartek Banachewicz Dec 1 '12 at 20:25
    
Let's not worry about these details right now, I just want this template argument deduction to work! This is just a snippet demonstrating the idea. Might be that I mixed it up right now. I mean c++11 was meant to screw that passing by reference but I can remember that some things like shared_ptr and probably also std::function were an exception. –  thesaint Dec 1 '12 at 20:28
    
Your forwarding doesn't work as you expect it to because std::function<T>&& is not of the form T&&. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 1 '12 at 20:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, you have completely screwed up your rvalue references. Your forwarding does not work at all.

Secondly, that's impossible in some cases.. For some function objects, you could infer the signature by taking the member function pointer to operator() and inspecting it's signature. But for others, they will be overloaded and it will not work.

template<typename T> struct get_signature;
template<typename Mem, typename Ret, typename... Args> 
struct get_signature<Ret(Mem::*)(Args...)> {
    typedef Ret(Args...) type;
};

template<class T> 
delegate<typename get_signature<&T::operator()>::type>* bind(T func)
{
    return nullptr;
}

Thirdly, std::bind?

share|improve this answer
    
Could you elaborate on the rvalue thing... Because the way I have done it above is what I have read in tutorials ^^. So It would be nice to know whats wrong abotu it... I will try your code right now. –  thesaint Dec 1 '12 at 20:34
    
You won't see any tutorial do it that way. T must be the type of the object- not std::function<T>. std::function<T>&& is always an rvalue reference. And std::forward must take T- as it is, you have always forwarded it as an rvalue. –  Puppy Dec 1 '12 at 20:35
    
@thesaint For perfect forwarding, the type being deduced must be of the form T&&. Otherwise it's just a plain old rvalue reference, rather than a funky "universal reference". –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 1 '12 at 20:35
    
well actually I have never seen "std::forward<std::function>()" in a tutorial ^^. But I am using "std::forward<TArgs>(args)..." for variadic forwadring so I thought it would extend like that to my above example. Probably a bit naive ;) –  thesaint Dec 1 '12 at 20:37
    
Clang does not compile your code :(. It has trouble with "typedef Ret(Args...) type;". The error message is almost 1000 characters too long for a comment ;). Could you look into it? Since I think this may solve the issue. I am only dealing with "normal" functions, so I guess they will not overload their operator. –  thesaint Dec 1 '12 at 20:44

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