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Is store function pointers with different parameters in a vector of void pointers.

unordered_map<string, vector<void*> > List;

template <typename T>
void Listen(string Name, function<void(T)> Function)
{
    List[Name].push_back(&Function);
}

Then I want to call them, assuming that T is the same type for Fire as used for the Listen.

template <typename T>
void Fire(string Name, T Data)
{
    auto Functions = List[Name];

    for (auto i = Functions.begin(); i != Functions.end(); ++i)
    {
        (function<void(T)>)i)(Data);
    }
}

But I get a compiler error which reads error C2064: term does not evaluate to a function taking 1 arguments in file ...\vc\include\xrefwrap 431 1.

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
You're pushing the address of a parameter. –  chill Dec 1 '12 at 20:32
1  
Why don't you save std::function's in the List? –  Lol4t0 Dec 1 '12 at 20:41
    
@Lol4t0. Sadly I can't save different types in the same list. For example function<void(int)>, function<void(class*)> and function<void()> are all different types. –  danijar Dec 1 '12 at 20:43
    
@chill. Since it is a vector of void pointers what's wrong with that? –  danijar Dec 1 '12 at 20:45
1  
Yes, but you will not be able to determine the type of function when calling them also –  Lol4t0 Dec 1 '12 at 20:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For one, you're taking the address of a parameter, here:

List[Name].push_back(&Function);

Then you're trying to convert an iterator object to a std::function object here:

(function<void(T)>)i)

What you trying to do can be done, like this, although it's not pretty, to put it mildly:

unordered_map<string, vector<void*> > List;

template <typename T>
void Listen(string Name, function<void(T)> &Function)
{
    List[Name].push_back(&Function);
}

template <typename T>
void Fire(string Name, T Data)
{
    auto Functions = List[Name];

    for (auto i = Functions.begin(); i != Functions.end(); ++i)
    {
      function<void(T)> *ptr = *i;

      (*ptr) (Data);
    }
}

It can break in lot of ways, for example you have no control that the function, registered under some name in Listen is called with the correct argument in Fire - consider calling Listen<int> ("foo", f); and then doing Fire<double> ("foo", 3.14);

Another approach - just pass closures for callbacks:

unordered_map<string, std::vector<function<void()> > > List;

void Listen(string Name, function<void()> Function)
{
    List[Name].push_back(Function);
}

void Fire(string Name)
{
    auto Functions = List[Name];

    for (auto i = Functions.begin(); i != Functions.end(); ++i)
      (*i) ();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why is the & used on the parameter of the Listen function? Can I avoid that somehow? –  danijar Dec 1 '12 at 21:06
    
This is needed to ensure the function is called with an lvalue, i.e. with something that has an address. Still have to make sure that address stays valid as long as it's in the vector/map. –  chill Dec 1 '12 at 21:09
#include <functional>
#include <unordered_map>
#include <memory>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

template<typename T> struct BlockDeduction{typedef T type;};
struct BaseCallback {
  virtual ~BaseCallback();
  template<typename T>
  void DoCall( typename BlockDeduction<T>::type&& t ) const;
};
template<typename T>
struct Callback: BaseCallback
{
  std::function<void(T)> func;
  Callback( std::function<void(T)> const& f ):func(f) {}
};


template<typename T>
void BaseCallback::DoCall( typename BlockDeduction<T>::type&& t ) const {
  Assert( dynamic_cast<Callback<T>const*>(this) );
  static_cast<Callback<T>const*>(this).func(std::forward(t));
}

typedef std::unique_ptr<BaseCallback> upCallback;
template<typename T>
upCallback make_callback( std::function<void(T)> const& f ) {
  return upCallback( new Callback<T>( f ) );
}


struct Listener {
  std::unordered_map< std::string, std::vector<upCallback>> List;
  template<typename T>
  void Listen( std::string Name, std::function<void(T)> f) {
    List[Name].push_back( make_callback(f) );
  }
  template<typename T>
  void Fire( std::string Name, typename BlockDeduction<T>::type&& t ) {
    auto callbacks = List.find(Name);
    if (callbacks == List.end()) return;
    for(auto it = callbacks->second.begin(); it != callbacks->second.end(); ++it) {
      if (it +1 = callbacks->second.end())
      {
        (**it).DoCall<T>( std::forward(t) );
      } else {
        (**it).DoCall<T>( t );
      }
    }
  }
};

... or something like that.

This stores a copy of the std::function in the map, wrapped up generically. Memory is handled via a unique_ptr. I carefully blocked type deduction at points where the type must be exactly what you used when you installed the Listener (automatic type deduction at that point is rather fragile).

In debug, you'll get an assertion failure if you violate the Name<->type mapping.

Some extra work needs to be done for nullary callbacks. Just write a DoCall that casts BaseCallback to Callback<void>, specialize Callback<void> to be a nullary function wrapper, specialize make_callback on nullary function, and write a Fire(string) method for Listener that calls the bare DoCall.

Or create a struct Empty and use lambdas to wrap nullary functions in function<void(Empty)>, which would involve slightly less code, but would be slower at run-time.

share|improve this answer
    
I like that but I need some time to truly understand everything you did. –  danijar Dec 1 '12 at 21:38
    
Note that the std::forward crap might be wrong -- I'm still trying to grok it. I probably shouldn't have included it, and just done some redundant copies of type T. BlockDeduction only exists to block automatic function type deduction (because the T that Fire takes must match EXACTLY the same type as the T Listen takes, or undefined behavior results). The BaseCallback really exists in order to just have a virtual dtor (so its child class dtor is called), and the DoCall method is just putting the dangerous static_cast inside the class. unique_ptr manages lifetime. –  Yakk Dec 1 '12 at 22:12

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