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I have a script that uses an adjacency graph and the BFS algorithm to find a path between two points. The graph has about 10,000 vertexes and the script is set up like this:

graph = {...
         '9660': ['9661', '9662', '9659'],
         '9661': ['9654', '9660'],
         '9662': ['9660', '9663'],
         '9663': ['9664', '9662'],
         '9664': ['9665', '9663'],
                              ...}


def bfs(graph, start, end):
# maintain a queue of paths
queue = []
# push the first path into the queue
queue.append([start])
while queue:
    # get the first path from the queue
    path = queue.pop(0)
    # get the last node from the path
    node = path[-1]
    # path found
    if node == end:
        return path
    # enumerate all adjacent nodes, construct a new path and push it into the queue
    for adjacent in graph.get(node, []):
        new_path = list(path)
        new_path.append(adjacent)
        queue.append(new_path)

print bfs(graph, '50', '8659')

Because this algorithm works on small adjacency graphs, I'm guessing python just takes a really long time to process a graph this size. My goal is to find the shortest path but that's currently out of the question if I cant even find one path. Is there a python solution to handling path-finding using large adjacency graphs? If so, could I get an example?

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Shortest path(s) from where to where? –  irrelephant Dec 1 '12 at 21:04
    
use depth first instead and you will at least find a path i think ... maybe make it a generator that yieds as it goes also maybe ... –  Joran Beasley Dec 1 '12 at 21:04
1  
I think you're not keeping track of the nodes that you've visited? –  irrelephant Dec 1 '12 at 21:05
    
I think irrelephant is right –  Joran Beasley Dec 1 '12 at 21:06
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, but you don't have to visit any node twice in this kind of BFS. –  irrelephant Dec 1 '12 at 21:09
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1 Answer

You're not keeping track of visited nodes, which can lead to lots of wasted time if your graph is not a directed acyclic graph. For example, if your graph is

{'A': ['B', 'C', 'D', 'E'],
 'B': ['A', 'C', 'D'],
 'C': ['A', 'B', 'D'],
 'D': ['A', 'B', 'C'],
 'E': ['F'],
 'F': ['G'],
 'G': ['H'],
 ...
 'W': ['X'],
 'X': ['Y'],
 'Y': ['Z']}

calling bfs(graph, 'A', 'Z') with your algorithm would cycle unnecessarily through 'A', 'B', 'C' and 'D' before finally reaching Z. Whereas if you keep track of visited nodes, you only add the neighbors of 'A', 'B', 'C' and 'D' to the queue once each.

def bfs(graph, start, end):
    # maintain a queue of paths
    queue = []

    # push the first path into the queue
    queue.append([start])

    # already visited nodes
    visited = set()

    while queue:
        # get the first path from the queue
        path = queue.pop(0)

        # get the last node from the path
        node = path[-1]

        # if node has already been visited
        if node in visited:
            continue

        # path found
        if node == end:
            return path
        # enumerate all adjacent nodes, construct a new path and push it into the queue
        else:
            for adjacent in graph.get(node, []):
                # add the path only if it's end node hasn't already been visited
                if adjacent not in visited
                    new_path = list(path)
                    new_path.append(adjacent)
                    queue.append(new_path)

            # add node to visited set
            visited.add(node)

Using this version of the algorithm and the alphabet graph, here's what the queue and visited set would look like at the top of the while loop through the whole algorithm:

queue = [ ['A'] ]
visited = {}

queue = [ ['A', 'B'], ['A', 'C'], ['A', 'D'], ['A', 'E'] ]
visited = {'A'}

queue = [ ['A', 'C'], ['A', 'D'], ['A', 'E'], ['A', 'B', 'C'],
          ['A', 'B', 'D'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B'}

queue = [ ['A', 'D'], ['A', 'E'], ['A', 'B', 'C'], ['A', 'B', 'D'],
          ['A', 'C', 'D'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B', 'C'}

queue = [ ['A', 'E'], ['A', 'B', 'C'], ['A', 'B', 'D'], ['A', 'C', 'D'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D'}

queue = [ ['A', 'B', 'C'], ['A', 'B', 'D'], ['A', 'C', 'D'], ['A', 'E', 'F'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'}

queue = [ ['A', 'B', 'D'], ['A', 'C', 'D'], ['A', 'E', 'F'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'}

queue = [ ['A', 'C', 'D'], ['A', 'E', 'F'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'}

queue = [ ['A', 'E', 'F'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'}

queue = [ ['A', 'E', 'F', 'G'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F'}

queue = [ ['A', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G'}

...
...

queue = [ ['A', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', ..., 'X', 'Y', 'Z'] ]
visited = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', ..., 'X', 'Y'}

# at this point the algorithm will pop off the path,
# see that it reaches the goal, and return

This is much less work than adding paths like ['A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B', ...].

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