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I will explain the title better for starters. My problem is very similar to the common: find all permutations of an integer array problem.

I am trying to find, given a list of integers and a target number, if it is possible to select any combination of the numbers from the list, so that their sum matches the target. It must be done using functional programming practices, so that means all loops and mutations are out, clever recursion only. Full disclosure: this is a homework assignment, and the method header is set as is by the professor. This is what I've got:

public static Integer sum(final List<Integer> values) {
     if(values.isEmpty() || values == null) {
             return 0;
     }
     else {
             return values.get(0) + sum(values.subList(1, values.size()));
     }
 }

public static boolean groupExists(final List<Integer> numbers, final int target) {
     if(numbers == null || numbers.isEmpty()) {
             return false;
     }
     if(numbers.contains(target)) {
             return true;
     }
      if(sum(numbers) == target) {
              return true;
      }
      else {
              groupExists(numbers.subList(1, numbers.size()), target);
              return false;
      }
  }

The sum method is tested and working, the groupExists method is the one I'm working on. I think it's pretty close, if given a list[1,2,3,4], it will return true for targets such as 3 and 10, but false for 6, which confuses me because 1,2,3 are right in order and add to 6. Clearly something is missing. Also, The main problem I am looking at is that it is not testing all possible combinations, for example, the first and last numbers are not being added together as a possibility.

UPDATE: After working for a bit based on Simon's answer, this is what I'm looking at:

public static boolean groupExists(final List<Integer> numbers, final int target) {
     if(numbers == null || numbers.isEmpty()) {
             return false;
      }
     if(numbers.isEmpty()) {
              return false;
      }
      if(numbers.contains(target)) {
              return true;
      }
      if(sum(numbers.subList(1, numbers.size())) == (target - numbers.get(0))) {
              return true; }                                                                                                                                                                                                     
      else {
              return groupExists(numbers.subList(1, numbers.size()), target);
      }
  }
share|improve this question
    
You are checking only the list tails for the sum, there is quite a bit missing to test for all combinations. –  Marko Topolnik Dec 1 '12 at 22:22
    
yes that was covered in my post. –  Jake Sellers Dec 1 '12 at 22:26
    
You said "something is missing" and "it's pretty close". I said "you are checking only the list tails." and "there's quite a bit missing". –  Marko Topolnik Dec 1 '12 at 22:29
    
"The main problem I am looking at is that it is not testing all possible combinations, for example, the first and last numbers are not being added together as a possibility." –  Jake Sellers Dec 1 '12 at 22:31
    
You don't need to use sum(). Rework that into a call to groupExists() –  SpacedMonkey Dec 2 '12 at 0:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For convenience, declare

static Integer head(final List<Integer> is) {
  return is == null || is.isEmpty()? null : is.get(0);
}
static List<Integer> tail(final List<Integer> is) {
  return is.size() < 2? null : is.subList(1, is.size());
}

Then your function is this:

static boolean groupExists(final List<Integer> is, final int target) {
  return target == 0 || target > 0 && head(is) != null &&
       (groupExists(tail(is), target) || groupExists(tail(is), target-head(is)));
}

There are no surprises, really, regular checking of base cases plus the final line, where the left and right operands search for a "group" that does or does not, respectively, include the head.

The way I have written it makes it obvious at first sight that these are all pure functions, but, since this is Java and not an FP language, this way of writing it is quite suboptimal. It would be better to cache any function calls that occur more than once into final local vars. That would still be by the book, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
Marko, thanks very much for working on this. Just tested it out and it works great. I really like the way you test the possible permutations of the list. Thanks again! –  Jake Sellers Dec 2 '12 at 7:56
    
I touched it up a bit, it didn't short-circuit as soon as it reached target == 0. That's the equivalent of your numbers.contains(target). –  Marko Topolnik Dec 2 '12 at 11:29

Suppose you have n numbers a[0], a[1], ..., a[n-1], and you want to find out if some subset sums to N.

Suppose you have such a subset. Now, either a[0] is included, or it isn't. If it's included, then there must exist a subset of a[1], ..., a[n] which sums to N - a[0]. If it isn't, then there exists a subset of a[1], ..., a[n] which sums to N.

This leads you to a recursive solution.

share|improve this answer
    
A bit of a brain teaser heh, thanks for the tip. –  Jake Sellers Dec 1 '12 at 22:47

Checking all combinations is factorial (there's a bit missing on your implementation). Why not try a different (dynamic) approach: see the Hitchhikers Guide to Programming Contests, page 1 (Subset Sum).

Your main method will be something like:

boolean canSum(numbers, target) {
  return computeVector(numbers)[target]
}

computeVector return the vector with all numbers that can be summed with the set of numbers. The method computeVector is a bit trickier to do recursively, but you can do something like:

boolean[] computeVector(numbers, vector) {
  if numbers is empty:
    return vector

  addNumber(numbers[0], vector)

  return computeVector(tail(numbers), vector);
}

addNumber will take vector and 'fill it' with the new 'doable' numbers (see hitchhikers for an explanation). addNumber can also be a bit tricky, and I'll leave it for you. Basically you need to write the following loop in recrusive way:

for(j=M; j>=a[i]; j--)
  m[j] |= m[j-a[i]];
share|improve this answer
    
Reading the pdf now, and thanks for the nice response. :) –  Jake Sellers Dec 1 '12 at 22:36

The lists of all possible combinations can be reached by asking a very simple decision at each recursion. Does this combination contain the head of my list? Either it does or it doesn't, so there are 2 paths at each stage. If either path leads to a solution then we want to return true.

boolean combination(targetList, sourceList, target)
{
    if ( sourceList.isEmpty() ) {
        return sum(targetList) == target;
    } else {
        head = sourceList.pop();
        without = combination(targetList, sourceList, target); // without head
        targetList.push(head);
        with = combination(targetList, sourceList, target); // with head
        return with || without;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Breaks several of the rules in place for me but pushing me toward the solution so thank you :) –  Jake Sellers Dec 1 '12 at 23:16
    
What are the rules? –  SpacedMonkey Dec 1 '12 at 23:31
    
No mutation of any sort and my method only accepts one list. –  Jake Sellers Dec 1 '12 at 23:32

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