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I am using LibGDX for a project, and I am trying to tile/repeat a texture across a specific amount of space. At the moment I am using a TextureRegion set to the proper size, and any extra space off of the texture is being filled as you would expect in OpenGL using "Clamp To Edge". I figured there would be an easy way to change this behavior to the "Repeat" mode, however I cannot seem to find a way to make that work, despite it seeming like something that should be fairly easy to change.

So, basically, is there a simple way to repeat an image in a set area using LibGDX, short of having to manually build it by repeating the texture myself in some form of loop?

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2 Answers 2

If you're using a TextureRegion, you can use a TiledDrawable like so:

TiledDrawable tile = new TiledDrawable(textureRegion);
tile.draw(spriteBatcher, x, y, width, height);
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This works great :P –  martindilling Aug 26 '14 at 1:24
    
Works perfect, plus it can be used with Texture Atlas & Sprites. –  iLoveUnicorns Apr 8 at 10:41
    
Only works in pixels and not world coordinates. The API would be better if the width and height were in the world coordinates the batch is in via SetProjectionMatrix –  RichieHH Aug 21 at 18:44

I haven't tried this myself, but I found this post on google when trying to troubleshoot another issue. In the LIBGDX api I found this method, maybe it could help?

http://libgdx.l33tlabs.org/docs/api/com/badlogic/gdx/graphics/Texture.html#setWrap(com.badlogic.gdx.graphics.Texture.TextureWrap, com.badlogic.gdx.graphics.Texture.TextureWrap)

This isn't for a texture region though, rather the texture itself...

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I found that prior to asking, but I was having trouble getting things working with "Texture" as apposed to "TextureRegion". For now I have gotten around this problem by modifying the classes of LibGDX itself slightly, which certainly isn't ideal, but it does the trick. –  Shamrock Dec 4 '12 at 1:40
    
@Shamrock can you post here how you got it done? what did you change? –  Mars Feb 13 '14 at 10:29

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