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I need to be able to check xml with html-style table data to ensure that it's "rectangular". For example this is rectangular (2x2)

<table>
  <tr>
    <td>Foo</td>
    <td>Bar</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Baz</td>
    <td>Qux</td>
  </tr>
</table>

This is not

<table>
  <tr>
    <td>Foo</td>
    <td>Bar</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Baz</td>
  </tr>
</table>

This is complicated by row and column spans and the fact that I need to accept two styles of markup, either where spanned cells are included as empty td or where span cells are omitted.

<!-- good (3x2), spanned cells included -->
<table>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="2">Foo</td>
    <td/>
    <td rowspan="2">Bar</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Baz</td>
    <td>Qux</td>
    <td/>
  </tr>
</table>

<!-- also good (3x2), spanned cells omitted -->
<table>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="2">Foo</td>
    <td rowspan="2">Bar</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Baz</td>
    <td>Qux</td>
  </tr>
</table>

Here are a bunch of examples of bad tables where it's ambiguous how to deal with them

<!-- bad, looks like spanned cells are included but more cells in row 1 than 2 -->
<table>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="2">Foo</td>
    <td/>
    <td rowspan="2">Bar</td>
    <td>BAD</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Baz</td>
    <td>Qux</td>
    <td/>
  </tr>
</table>

<!-- bad, looks like spanned cells are omitted but more cells in row 1 than 2 -->
<table>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="2">Foo</td>
    <td rowspan="2">Bar</td>
    <td>BAD</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Baz</td>
    <td>Qux</td>
  </tr>
</table>

<!-- bad, can't tell if spanned cells are included or omitted -->
<table>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="2">Foo</td>
    <td rowspan="2">Bar</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Baz</td>
    <td>Qux</td>
    <td/>
  </tr>
</table>

<!-- bad, looks like spanned cells are omitted but a non-emtpy cell is overspanned -->
<table>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="2">Foo</td>
    <td rowspan="2">Bar</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Baz</td>
    <td>Qux</td>
    <td>BAD</td>
  </tr>
</table>

I already have a working XSLT 2.0 solution for this problem that involves normalizing the data to the "spanned cells included" style then validating, however, my solution is cumbersome and starts to perform poorly for tables with an area of greater than 1000 cells. My normalization and validation routines involve iterating sequentially over the cells and passing along a param of cells that should be created by spans and inserting them when I pass their coordinates in the table. I'm not happy with either of them.

I'm looking for suggestions about cleverer ways in which to achieve this validation that hopefully would have better performance profiles on large tables. I need to account for th and td but omitted th from the examples for sake of simplicity, they can be included or ignored in any answers. I'm not checking to see if thead, tbody, and/or tfoot have the same width, this can also be included or omitted. I'm currently using XSLT 2.0 but I'd be interested in 3.0 solutions if they were significantly better than a solution implemented in 2.0.

share|improve this question
    
Concerning the "spanned cells included as empty": Can it be assumed that any empty cell signifies a continued spanned cell (or however you might call it)? This isn't "true" HTML, is it? Because then the empty cells should not be there, right? –  Thomas W Dec 2 '12 at 9:52
    
@ThomasW No there could be empty cells that are just truly empty, the @rowspan and @colspan are the only indication that there are spans. And no this is not true HTML, it's actually a few different schemas that have tables that are modeled very similar to the HTML table model. –  nine9ths Dec 2 '12 at 20:35
1  
But then you can't tell whether the table is degenerate or not because you don't know whether a cell is truly empty or a placeholder for a span. –  Thomas W Dec 2 '12 at 20:55
    
My current solution processes the entire table to see if there is at least one empty cell for every span, if there is then I treat the table as if they've included empty cells, if there are less empty cells than spans then I treat it as if they didn't include empty cells for spans. –  nine9ths Dec 3 '12 at 0:18

1 Answer 1

I don't think this kind of problem is suited for XSLT - especially if you have to process very large tables.

I'd suggest to develop a solution using a procedural languge - maybe using XSLT to pre- or post- process the XML.

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