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So I have a project in my cyber security class to make a bash game. I like to make one of those medieval games where you make farms and mines to get resources. Well I like to make something like that. To do that I have to have two while loops running. Like this

while [ blah ]; do

    blah

done

while [ blah ]; do

    blah    

done

Is it possible to run two while loops at the same time and if I am writing it wrong how do I write it?

share|improve this question
1  
How does "Yes, No, Maybe" grab you for an answer? A lot depends on what you're planning for those two loops to do, and how they will communicate with each other. You can nest loops, but that's probably not what you're after. You can run two processes in background that are able to run concurrently; you have to know how they'll communicate with each other, and the top process needs to do something (or almost nothing, just hang around) while they're running. The IPC for the two processes will be your main problem; how do they communicate? – Jonathan Leffler Dec 2 '12 at 0:33
up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you put a & after each done, like done&, you will create new processes in the background that run the while loops. You will have to be careful to realize what this means though, since the bash script will continue executing commands after creating those new processes even if they are not finished. You might use the wait command to prevent this from happening, but I'm not too used to using that so I cannot vouch for it.

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thank you i'll start testing it out to see how it work. And do you know any info an how I use wait. – Lifetake Dec 2 '12 at 0:52
2  
Using wait is trivial; you write wait in your script as a command on its own. The script doesn't move on to the next command (after the wait) until all the child processes started by the script have completed. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 2 '12 at 0:56
    
Hey also would it look like this. – Lifetake Dec 2 '12 at 0:57
1  
It will be just like you proposed in the comment you made earlier. while condition; do COMMANDS; done & while other_condition; do OTHER_COMMANDS; done & wait, basically. The most important part here concurrency, and all that that entails. That would probably be an important part for you to focus on should you go with this route. Otherwise I'd suggest you make a large main program loop that just goes through the different things that need to be done each step in the game loop, rather than have several loops running at the same time. – Victor Zamanian Dec 2 '12 at 1:29
1  
It depends on your script. If you have further commands after the while loops that you don't want to run until the loops are finished, then you need to use wait. If you don't have further commands that should not run unless the loops are finished, then you don't need wait. – Victor Zamanian Dec 2 '12 at 1:38

Yes, but you will have to fork a new process for each while loop to be executing in. Technically, they won't both run at the same time (unless you consider multiple cores, but this isn't even garaunteed).

Below is a link to how to fork multiple processes using bash.

Forking / Multi-Threaded Processes | Bash

Since you mention this is a school project, I'll stop here lest I help you "not learn".

R

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I don't quite understand what this forking thing is, I don't understand what happening by using it. – Lifetake Dec 2 '12 at 0:56
1  
On Unix, fork() is the system call used to create every new process except the very first. Your shell uses fork() every time it runs a new command (except when you invoke the new command with exec). It uses fork() when you run a shell script in the background with the &; after the fork(), the child process gets on with the background work while the parent shell gets on with its next job. The fork() system call gives you two almost identical copies of the original process; the main difference is that the child's process ID (PID) is different, and it knows that it is the child. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 2 '12 at 0:59
1  
And I'd imagine you would get some kudos from implementing fork in the project as it probably wasn't assumed or suggested and therefore would seem a bit ingenious (or look like you asked online, heh) – Ross Dec 2 '12 at 1:14

You could also use nested for loops

for (( i = 1; i <= 5; i++ ))      ### Outer for loop ###
do

    for (( j = 1 ; j <= 5; j++ )) ### Inner for loop ###
    do
         echo -n "$i "
    done

    echo "" #### print the new line ###

done

EDIT: I thought you meant Nested Loop but reading again you said running both loops "at the same time". I will leave my answer here though.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't think that's what the OP meant by "at the same time". – Victor Zamanian Dec 2 '12 at 0:34
    
it is the same time – Lifetake Dec 2 '12 at 0:49

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