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#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::ifstream file("data.bin", std::ios::binary );

    if( file.fail() )
    {
        std::cout << "File does not exist or could not open file";

        return 0;
    }

    std::vector<short> buffer;

    std::copy( 
            std::istreambuf_iterator<char>( file ),
            std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(),
            std::back_inserter( buffer )
            );

   return 0;
}

This only gives me ranges of char values (-128, 128).

I thought using istreambuf_iterator<short> would give me what I want but it throws an "invalid conversion" error.

What can I do to read binary values that are in the short range?

share|improve this question
    
You need to show the errors given by istreambuf_iterator<short>. –  Puppy Dec 2 '12 at 11:35
    
@DeadMG It's only one, and I did mention it was an "invalid conversion" error. –  Tek Dec 2 '12 at 13:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's my recommended Spirit approach:

#include <fstream>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>

namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;

int main()
{
    std::ifstream file("data.bin", std::ios::binary);
    if(!file)
        std::cout << "File does not exist or could not open file";
    boost::spirit::istream_iterator f(file), l;

    std::vector<int16_t> buffer;
    bool ok = qi::parse(f, l, *qi::word, buffer);
}

Of course, there is qi::dword, qi::qword, big-endian/little-endian variatations etc.:


You can look at wchar_t

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>
int main()
{
    std::wifstream file("data.bin", std::ios::binary );
    if( file.fail() )
    {
        std::cout << "File does not exist or could not open file";
        return 0;
    }
    std::vector<wchar_t> buffer;
    std::copy( 
            std::istreambuf_iterator<wchar_t>( file ),
            std::istreambuf_iterator<wchar_t>(),
            std::back_inserter( buffer )
            );
}

I'm not too sure whether the actual size of wchar_t is implementation defined.

share|improve this answer
1  
The actual size of wchar_t is implementation defined: It is 16 bits for Windows compilers and 32 bits for most UNIXes. It is at least 16 bits, though. I don't know what the relevant section is but 5.3.3 [expr.sizeof] paragraph 1 has a note stating this fact: "[ Note: in particular, sizeof(bool), sizeof(char16_t), sizeof(char32_t), and sizeof(wchar_t) are implementation-defined.74 —end note ]" –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 2 '12 at 1:34
    
I have provided a 'sane' approach with a simple Spirit parser. –  sehe Dec 2 '12 at 1:38
    
You know, I had a problem that was vector related earlier today and I got "yelled" at for using fread() instead of fstream to read into the vector. fread() was working fine, but I decided to try fstream for "C++ approach sake" as stated in the comments. But now I'm doubting fstream's practicality with binary files if it takes much more work to be able to use it for what seems to be wasting my time. –  Tek Dec 2 '12 at 1:42
    
@Tek: There's nothing wrong with using fread. You can also use the fstream read function, if you find this usage of std::copy for reading binary files as distasteful as I do. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 2 '12 at 1:56
    
@BenjaminLindley Thanks, I think I will keep using at least the read function for now since it's less arguments. I'll keep the question open to see if any other interesting suggestions come up. –  Tek Dec 2 '12 at 2:07

The class std::istreambuf_iterator<cT> iterates over the characters extracted from a std::basic_istream<cT, std::char_traits<cT>> or, actually, its std::basic_streambuf<cT, std::char_traits<cT>>. That is, given a specific stream type, there is no choice for the std::istreambuf_iterator<cT>. Also note that the IOStream layer is not intended to operate on binary files, despite the std::ios_base::binary operation which is passed to the stream buffers.

If you want to extract shorts (or any other type than the stream's character type) you'd need to create a suitable iterator yourself which takes the chosen binary format the file was written in into account. This iterator can be built in terms of std::istreambuf_iterator<char> or directly access the std::streambuf.

share|improve this answer
1  
The explanation is great, thanks. But code examples would be much more appreciated to show what you mean. I'm new to C++ and I'm sure other people that will read this too. You don't have to of course, just a suggestion. –  Tek Dec 2 '12 at 1:47

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