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Possible Duplicate:
Need to convert String^ to char *

I have been looking so long for this solution but I can't find nothing specific. I work in Visual Studio C++, windows forms app. I need to convert String^ value into char array. I have stored value from TextBox in String^:

String^ target_str = targetTextBox->Text;

// lets say that input is "Need this string"

I need to convert this String^ and get output similar to this:

char target[] = "Need this string";

If it is defined as char target[] it works but I want to get this value from TextBox.

I have tried marshaling but it didn't work. Is there any solution how to do this?

I have found how to convert std::string to char array so another way how to solve this is to convert String^ to std::string but I have got problems with this too.

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marked as duplicate by svick, Peter O., Ram kiran, Praveen Kumar, nhahtdh Dec 3 '12 at 4:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
FYI this is not C++ but C++/CLI, a different language. – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 2 '12 at 1:59
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Retagged – Keith Thompson Dec 2 '12 at 3:11
    
I've added my solution to the original question, but basically I found that using sprintf() is the easiest way. No need to call the Marshal functions. – Ionian316 Jan 23 '15 at 18:07

Your best bet is to follow the examples set forth in this question.

Here's some sample code:

String^ test = L"I am a .Net string of type System::String";
IntPtr ptrToNativeString = Marshal::StringToHGlobalAnsi(test);
char* nativeString = static_cast<char*>(ptrToNativeString.ToPointer());

The reason for this is because a .Net string is obviously a GC'd object that's part of the Common Language Runtime, and you need to cross the CLI boundary by employing the InteropServices boundary. Best of luck.

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Thanks for answer, but this solution didn't work for me. I have tried marshalling but this solution don't mimics char[]. So i can't work with this char* as with char[]. Is there any idea how to convert String^ to std::string?? – user1869623 Dec 2 '12 at 12:05
    
In C++ char* and char[] are equivalent, and therefore you can use a variable of type char* just as you would char[]. Have you tried taking the char* and passing it into whichever routine or method you're trying to call? – Maurice Reeves Dec 3 '12 at 5:17
    
Thanks Maurice, you were right. Problem was that i was using 2d static array array [x][sizeof(nativeString]and value char* was not static as when i defined it as char[] = "Static string" I didn't notice that so when i use dynamic array it works. Thanks for help. – user1869623 Dec 3 '12 at 17:16
    
My pleasure. Best of luck with what you're working on. – Maurice Reeves Dec 4 '12 at 5:09

In C/C++ there is equivalence between char[] and char* : at runtime char[] is no more than a char* pointer to the first element of the array.

So you can use you char* where a char[] is expected :

#include <iostream>
using namespace System;
using namespace System::Runtime::InteropServices;

void display(char s[])
{
    std::cout << s << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    String^ test = L"I am a .Net string of type System::String";
    IntPtr ptrToNativeString = Marshal::StringToHGlobalAnsi(test);
    char* nativeString = static_cast<char*>(ptrToNativeString.ToPointer());
    display(nativeString);
}

So I think you can accept Maurice's answer :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you both for the answer. You were right this conversion works. Problem was that i was using a static 2d array array [x][sizeof(nativeString] and value char* was not static as when i defined it as char[] = "Static string" It seems that i have to use dynamic array for this solution. Thanks – user1869623 Dec 2 '12 at 21:43

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