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I'm getting a compiler error on the following code (snippet). Why is this code incorrect? an solution

protected Dialog onCreateDialog(int paramInt)
{
 switch (paramInt)
 {
 default:
 case 0:
 }
 for (Object localObject = null; ; localObject = this.dialog)
 {
  return localObject; // here problem cast
  this.dialog = new ProgressDialog(this);
  this.dialog.setMessage(getResources().getString(2131165201));
  this.dialog.setIndeterminate(true);
  this.dialog.setCancelable(false);
 }
}
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closed as not a real question by Vulcan, Andrew Thompson, jusio, Mac, aromero Dec 2 '12 at 21:58

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Did you read the message? –  SLaks Dec 2 '12 at 2:39
2  
In the future, you will always want to post the error message with your question. It usually holds the key to the problem, as it does in this case, since it tells you (and us) exactly what is wrong. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 2 '12 at 2:39
2  
Interesting for loop too. Why the very strange loop? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 2 '12 at 2:42
    
return localObject; // here problem cast Please copy/paste the error rather than paraphrase it. –  Andrew Thompson Dec 2 '12 at 3:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are having return statement before this.dialog = new ProgressDialog(this); which becomes unreachable code because control will never reach to the next direct statement after return statement. This will result into compilation error. You need to flip the order as:

    for (Dialog localObject = null; ; localObject = this.dialog)
    {
       this.dialog = new ProgressDialog(this);
       return localObject;
     }

I am not sure what your loop will do but one thing is sure that it will not loop but simply return in first iteration itself. Also your localObject will remain null as it will not reach the increment block of the for loop(it returns beforehand because of return statement).

EDIT: Just to fix your compilation error, move your return statement in the bottom of the loop as:

    protected Dialog onCreateDialog(int paramInt)
    {
       switch (paramInt)
       {
         default:
         case 0:
       }
       for (Dialog localObject = null; ; localObject = this.dialog)
       {
          this.dialog = new ProgressDialog(this);
          this.dialog.setMessage(getResources().getString(2131165201));
          this.dialog.setIndeterminate(true);
          this.dialog.setCancelable(false);
          return localObject; // here problem cast
       }
      }

As I mentioned earlier, I am not getting the real reason of using the for loop as it's not going to loop at all because of the return statement inside.

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+1, but the key point you're missing is that directly unreachable code will not compile. –  Vulcan Dec 2 '12 at 2:39
    
@Vulcan: I explicitly added the message stating the same. –  Yogendra Singh Dec 2 '12 at 2:42
    
error at compilation, "cannot convert from Object to Dialog" –  BJ_fr Dec 2 '12 at 3:07
    
@user1854920 You localObject declaration should be of type Dialog instead of Object i.e. Dialog localObject = null. I updated the answer. –  Yogendra Singh Dec 2 '12 at 3:11

You can't (or shouldn't) have any code after a return. It's called "dead"or "unreachable" code.

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for (Object localObject = null; ; localObject = this.dialog) {
   return localObject;
   this.dialog = new ProgressDialog(this);
}

First of all, you are returning localObject, which is set to null. Not sure if that is giving you a Null Pointer Exception or not, but it seems fishy. Secondly, as Yogendra said, the program never reaches the this.dialog = new ProgressDialog(this); statement as anything after a return statement becomes dead code.

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