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I want to set the function pointer at runtime. But i'm stuck here. When i use global function or static class member function, everything is ok. but, when the function is ordinary class member functions. i always got compiler errors. Here is the code:

class A   
{
    int val;
public:
    A() { val = 0; }
    A(int j) { val = j; }

    int aFun(int k) {val -= k; return val; }
};

typedef int (* func)(int );
class B
{
    func m_addr;
public:
    B(func param)
        : m_addr(param)
    {

    }
    void execute()
    {
        cout << m_addr(9) << endl;
    }
};

I'm trying to use them like this:

/* error C2355: 'this' : can only be referenced inside non-static member functions error C2064: term does not evaluate to a function taking 1 arguments class does not define an 'operator()' or a user defined conversion operator to a pointer-to-function or reference-to-function that takes appropriate number of arguments */

A a;
B b(A::aFun); 
b.execute();

after googled a lot, i found that std::mem_fun may be helpful. but i don't know how to use it. anyone can help me?

PS: i'm using Visual C++ 2010

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Class member functions have an extra parameter passed to it the by the compiler called this, so the compiler sees aFun as begin declared and written as

int A::aFun(A* this, int k)
{
    this->val -= k;
    return this->val;
}

Static/global functions don't have this parameter and so compilation succeeds.

In order to use A::aFun you'll need an instance of class A somewhere.

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then, what's your solution to my post? how about std::mem_fun? –  Triumphant Dec 2 '12 at 4:22

modified as following:

static int val;

class A   
{

public:
    A() { val = 0; }
    A(int j) { val = j; }

  static  int aFun(int k) {val -= k; return val; }
};
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I didn't get exactly what are you trying to do but I saw an error, maybe helps you.

That's a pointer to a function, isn't?

 typedef int (* func)(int );

But you don't have a function, you have a method of a class. (a member function) So the typedef shoud be probability:

typedef int (A::*func)(int );

I hope helps you a bit, you can google for pointers to member functions and you will find some examples.

Good luck!

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Note: if you try exactly my code won't work because A::aFun haven't been instanced in B. –  dmayola Dec 2 '12 at 23:17
    
Note2: Now, B b(A::aFun); might be B b(&A::aFun); –  dmayola Dec 2 '12 at 23:18

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