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I have a table with two numeric rows, one of which is set to key. I would like to subset my data.table by numeric key value, but it doesn't seem to work. When I convert it to character, it works.

Could you help me to understand why is that? I am using data.table 1.8.6.

Thanks a bunch. Here is the test code:

> ID <-c(rep(210, 9), rep(3917,6))
> Count <- c(1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1)
> x <- data.table(ID, Count)
> 
> # numeric key doesn't work with i argument
> setkey(ID)
 [1]  210  210  210  210  210  210  210  210  210 3917 3917 3917 3917 3917 3917
> x[210,list(ID, Count)]
   ID Count
1: NA    NA
> 
> # create character key
> x$charID <- as.character(x$ID)
> setkey(x, charID)
> x["210",list(ID, Count)]
   charID  ID Count
1:    210 210     1
2:    210 210     1
3:    210 210     0
4:    210 210     1
5:    210 210     1
6:    210 210     1
7:    210 210     1
8:    210 210     1
9:    210 210     1
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Is ID numeric or factor? –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 2 '12 at 4:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You need to send the numeric key within a data.table. This is done easily using J. Or in a list

Note that you need to specify the data.table when setting the key eg

setkey(x, ID)
x[J(210)]
    ID Count
1: 210     1
2: 210     1
3: 210     0
4: 210     1
5: 210     1
6: 210     1
7: 210     1
8: 210     1
9: 210     1

or

x[list(210)]
    ID Count
1: 210     1
2: 210     1
3: 210     0
4: 210     1
5: 210     1
6: 210     1
7: 210     1
8: 210     1
9: 210     1
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Thanks a lot, mnel. It works like a charm. –  AdamNYC Dec 2 '12 at 5:11
    
Not sure why this is -- I have a key which is numeric, with negative values. I try to use the syntax J(-1) and it doesn't work, but the list(-1) does work. May be of use to someone :) –  Meep Feb 4 '14 at 22:08

When you ask R for x[210, ] it is looking for the 210th row in x.
If x had 210+ rows, it would return that value (albeit not the row you were intending). Since there is no 210th row, it gives you NA.

When you instead ask for x['210', ], it is looking for the row in x labeled '210'



Try this to see the differences:

 vec <- LETTERS[1:9]
 names(vec) <- c(11:18, 1)

Now compare:

 vec[[11]]
 vec[['11']]


 vec[[1]]
 vec[['1']]
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Thanks for your explanation, Ricardo. Could you advise on how I can make it work? If I still use numeric key ID, then there will be type mismatch –  AdamNYC Dec 2 '12 at 4:30
    
I think this probably will do a vector search, which is not what I want. In fact, I used data.table here because I want to use binary search functionality of it. –  AdamNYC Dec 2 '12 at 4:38
1  
Makes sense. Is there a reason you don't want to simply use x$id <- as.character(x$id)? –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 2 '12 at 4:44
    
Thanks Ricardo. Your solution would work fine for me. I have to set/reset keys quite often (just to utilize binary search for my large dataset) to create new variables, so I would rather have a more convenient way to do it. After all, I think the point of numeric key index is to make subsetting using it. –  AdamNYC Dec 2 '12 at 4:48
    
I think this is really strange.... I was able to subset by a numerical index (in my own example) for key==.1 and key==.2, but then it failed on key==.3. –  geneorama Jan 7 '13 at 7:38

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