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How should I modify this boost::spirit code to parse for any combination of ranges or lists?

Note that this question is somewhat different from my previous question. In this case, I don't have a special pre-tag like RANGE: and LIST: that helps me parse, so I'm not sure if we require some kind of look-ahead here.

I do need to keep the parses separate, though, as doing so will help me capture the results into different data structures.

objective get all four test-cases to pass

EDIT ANSWER that seems to work with more complicated expressions

// #define BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG

#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/fusion/include/tuple.hpp>
#include <boost/tuple/tuple.hpp>
#include <boost/fusion/include/boost_tuple.hpp>

#include <iostream>

namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;

typedef std::vector<boost::tuple<std::string,std::vector<int>>>   MY_TYPE;

template <typename Iterator, typename Skipper>
struct my_grammar :
qi::grammar<Iterator, MY_TYPE(), Skipper>
{
    my_grammar() :
        my_grammar::base_type( entries )
    {
        entries %=
            *(
                +(qi::char_ - '-')
                >> qi::lit( "->" )
                >> ( comma | range )
            )
            ;

        range %= '{' >> qi::int_ >> ':' >> qi::int_ >> ':' >> qi::int_ >> '}';
        comma %= '{' >> (qi::int_ % ',') >> '}';

        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE( range   );
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE( comma   );
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE( entries );
    }

    qi::rule<Iterator, std::vector<int>(), Skipper> 
        range, comma;

    qi::rule<Iterator, MY_TYPE(), Skipper> 
        entries;
};

// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

static void TryParse( const std::string& input, const std::string& label )
{
    MY_TYPE entries;
    auto it(input.cbegin()), end( input.cend() );
    my_grammar<decltype(it), qi::space_type> entry_grammar;

    if (qi::phrase_parse(it, end, entry_grammar, qi::space, entries)
            && it == end)
    {
        std::cerr << label << " SUCCESS" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cerr << label << " FAIL" << std::endl;
    }
}

int
main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    std::string range_first = "foo -> {1:9:1}\nbar -> {1,2,3,4,5}\n";
    std::string comma_first = "foo -> {1,2,3,4,5}\nbar -> {1:9:1}\n";
    std::string comma_only  = "foo -> {1,2,3,4,5}\n";
    std::string range_only  = "foo -> {1:9:1}\n";

    TryParse( range_first, "RANGE FIRST" );
    TryParse( comma_first, "COMMA FIRST" );
    TryParse( range_only,  "RANGE ONLY"  );
    TryParse( comma_only,  "COMMA ONLY"  );
}

EDIT NEW OUTPUT (STILL CAN'T HANDLE HETEROGENEOUS LIST)

/tmp$ g++ -g -std=c++11 sandbox.cpp -o sandbox && ./sandbox 
COMMA FIRST FAIL
RANGE FIRST FAIL
COMMA ONLY SUCCESS
RANGE ONLY SUCCESS
/tmp$ 

EDIT IMPROVED CODE (STILL CAN'T HANDLE HETEROGENEOUS LIST)

// #define BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG

#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <iostream>

namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;

template <typename Iterator, typename Skipper>
struct my_grammar :
qi::grammar<Iterator, std::vector<int>(), Skipper>
{
    my_grammar() :
        my_grammar::base_type(entries)
    {
        entries %= 
            *('{' >> qi::int_
            >> ( range_tail | comma_tail ))
        ;

        range_tail %= ':' >> qi::int_ >> ':' >> qi::int_ >> '}';
        comma_tail %= *( ',' >> qi::int_ ) >> '}';

        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(entries   );
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(comma_tail);
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(range_tail);
    }

    qi::rule<Iterator, std::vector<int>(), Skipper> entries, comma_tail, range_tail;
};

// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

static void TryParse( const std::string& input, const std::string& label )
{
    std::vector<int> entries;
    auto it(input.cbegin()), end( input.cend() );
    my_grammar<decltype(it), qi::blank_type> entry_grammar;

    if (qi::phrase_parse(it, end, entry_grammar, qi::blank, entries)
            && it == end)
    {
        std::cerr << label << " SUCCESS" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cerr << label << " FAIL" << std::endl;
    }
}

int
main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    std::string range_first = "{3:5:7}\n{1,2,3,4,5}";
    std::string comma_first = "{1,2,3,4,5}\n{3:5:7}";
    std::string comma_only  = "{1,2,3,4,5}";
    std::string range_only  = "{3:5:7}";

    TryParse( comma_first, "COMMA FIRST" );
    TryParse( range_first, "RANGE FIRST" );
    TryParse( comma_only,  "COMMA ONLY"  );
    TryParse( range_only,  "RANGE ONLY"  );
}

ORIGINAL CODE

compile and run

/tmp$ g++ -g -std=c++11 sandbox.cpp -o sandbox && ./sandbox 
COMMA FIRST FAIL
RANGE FIRST FAIL
COMMA ONLY SUCCESS
RANGE ONLY FAIL
/tmp$ 

sandbox.cpp

// #define BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG

#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <iostream>


namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;
typedef int Entry;

template <typename Iterator, typename Skipper>
struct my_grammar :
qi::grammar<Iterator, std::vector<Entry>(), Skipper>
{
    my_grammar() :
        my_grammar::base_type(entries)
    {
        entries %= 
            *( 
                '{' >>
                    ( comma_list | range_list )
                >> '}'
            )
        ;

        comma_list %= qi::int_ % ',';
        range_list %= qi::int_ >> ':' >> qi::int_ >> ':' >> qi::int_;

        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(entries);
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(comma_list);
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(range_list);
    }

    qi::rule<Iterator, std::vector<Entry>(), Skipper> entries, comma_list, range_list;
};

// -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
static void TryParse( const std::string& input, const std::string& label )
{
    std::vector<Entry> entries;
    auto it(input.cbegin()), end( input.cend() );
    my_grammar<decltype(it), qi::blank_type> entry_grammar;

    if (qi::phrase_parse(it, end, entry_grammar, qi::blank, entries)
            && it == end)
    {
        std::cerr << label << " SUCCESS" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cerr << label << " FAIL" << std::endl;
    }
}

int
main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    std::string range_first = "{3:5:7}\n{1,2,3,4,5}";
    std::string comma_first = "{1,2,3,4,5}\n{3:5:7}";
    std::string comma_only  = "{1,2,3,4,5}";
    std::string range_only  = "{3:5:7}";

    TryParse( range_first, "COMMA FIRST" );
    TryParse( comma_first, "RANGE FIRST" );
    TryParse( comma_only,  "COMMA ONLY"  );
    TryParse( range_only,  "RANGE ONLY"  );
}
share|improve this question
1  
blank doesn't skip over \n only spaces or tabs(Documentation). space does skip returns and new lines. – user1252091 Dec 2 '12 at 7:40
    
+1 @llonesmiz - ty - you're right - changing all to space fixes it... ...unfortunately, this snippet is not a good example of my real problem. I have a parse where that comma_list or range_list is deep inside a statement parse (the rhs). Somehow, this example doesn't work in the real code... ...looking into it now. – kfmfe04 Dec 2 '12 at 7:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Consume the leading number in common code. After that number have either a range tail or a list tail. List tails start with a , and range tails start with a :.

Possibly fold the } into the tail, so a list tail is (,number)*} and a range tail is :number:number}, which makes the empty list easier to parse.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a good answer - I have edited the OP to use tail-recursion so we can now handle either a range_tail or a comma_tail but still trying to get any mix of the two to work. – kfmfe04 Dec 2 '12 at 6:10
    
So it now handles one list or the other. And if you follow the advice above and skip newlines it handles one list then the other? – Yakk Dec 2 '12 at 11:32
    
Actually, the skipping the new lines was probably the main cause. Once I fixed the second chunk of code in the OP with space instead of blank it worked for a mix of lists and ranges. However, I will accept your answer as it makes clear in the code a problem with this grammar: I cannot tell if I have a range-type or a comma-type until I have parsed beyond that first item. – kfmfe04 Dec 2 '12 at 13:10

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