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I want to create object instance whose type is determined by runtime data:

trait Business
case class Business1() extends Business 
case class Business2() extends Business

object Business {
  def fromData(data:Array[Byte]): Business = data(0) match {
    case 1 => new Business1
    case 2 => new Business2
    case _ => throw new RuntimeException("data error")
  }
}

The above code can do its job but has a problem that it is closed. Whenever I implement a new Business subclass, I'll have to modify Business.fromData code, e.g.

case 3 => new Business3

How can I define Business.fromData once and can later add Business3, Business4 without registering to it?

Edit

I finally realized that this is a perfect use case of Multimethod, that is, dispatching based on a function of some argument. So the more general question should be "How to do multimethod in scala"? I believe design patterns exist only because of language incapability, that is why I am reluctant to accept a factory based answer.

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1  
will I burn in hell for suggesting java reflection? :) –  Denis Tulskiy Dec 2 '12 at 9:17

4 Answers 4

This doesn't solve your problem but if you make Business a "sealed" trait then the compiler will at catch any non-exhaustive match until you've updated fromData:

sealed trait Business
case class Business1() extends Business
case class Business2() extends Business

biz match {
    case Business1 => println("Business1")
}

...will result in...

warning: match is not exhaustive!
missing combination            Business2
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You could also do this. Although I'm not sure if that is better then match case. Depends on what you are trying to do.

class Business {
  override def toString = "Business"
}

val factories: Map[Int, () => Business] = Map(
  1 -> (() => new Business {
    override def toString = "Business1"
  }),
  2 -> (() => new Business {
    override def toString = "Business2"
  }),
  3 -> (() => new Business {
    override def toString = "Business3"
  })
)

object Business {
  def fromData(data: Array[Byte]): Business = factories(data(0))()
}

val b = Business.fromData(Array(1,1,2))
println(b)
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factories is still closed –  xiefei Dec 2 '12 at 10:35

The classic answer is by using a factory with registration, a.k.a. abstract factory.

So given your hierarchy above, you'd create a 'factories' map just like the one presented here in another answer, but you'd also create a parallel hierarchy of object creators, and register them on start up, like so:

trait BusinessCreator {
  def createBusiness() : Business 
}
object BusinessCreator1() extends BusinessCreator {
  override def createBusiness() : Business = new Business1()

  factories += "1" -> this
}
//etc.

Another more 'Scalaish' way to do it would be to skip the parallel hierarchy and just register a creator function in the factories object from a companion object to each class, but the idea is the same.

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This won't work since the 'BusinessCreator' instance is lazily created - it won't be instantiated until it is referenced. So you would need to reference all your creators which is again a closed process. –  Marius Danila Dec 3 '12 at 10:37

What about this one?

val factories = collection.mutable.Map(
  1 -> new Function0[Business] { 
    private[this] lazy val single = new Business {
      override def toString = "Business1"
    }
    override def apply() = single 
  }
  ,2 -> new Function0[Business] { 
    private[this] lazy val single = new Business {
      override def toString = "Business2"
    }
    override def apply() = single 
  }
  ,3 -> new Function0[Business] { 
    private[this] lazy val single = new Business {
      override def toString = "Business3"
    }
    override def apply() = single 
  }
)
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