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I am trying to implement a shortest path algorithm using BFS. That is I am trying to find the shortest path from a specified vertex to every other vertex. However, its a special case where all edge weights are either 1 or 2. I know it could be done with Dijkstra's algorithm but I must use Breadth First Search.

So far I have a working version of BFS that searches first for a vertex connected with an edge of weight 1. If it cannot find it, then returns a vertex connected with an edge of weight 2. After thinking about it, this is not the correct way to find the shortest path. The problem is I cannot think of any reasoning why BFS would work with weights 1 or 2, as opposed to any weight.

Here is the code:

public void addEdge(int start, int end, int weight)
  {
  adjMat[start][end] = 1;
  adjMat[end][start] = 1;
  edge_weight[start][end] = weight; 
  edge_weight[end][start] = weight; 
  }

// -------------------------------------------------------------
public void bfs()                   // breadth-first search
  {                                // begin at vertex 0
  vertexList[0].wasVisited = true; // mark it
  displayVertex(0);                // display it
  theQueue.insert(0);              // insert at tail
  int v2;

  while( !theQueue.isEmpty() )     // until queue empty,
     {
     int v1 = theQueue.remove();   // remove vertex at head
     // until it has no unvisited neighbors
     while( (v2=getAdjUnvisitedVertex(v1)) != -1 ){// get one,
        vertexList[v2].wasVisited = true;  // mark it
        displayVertex(v2);                 // display it
        theQueue.insert(v2);               // insert it
        }
     }  // end while(queue not empty)

  // queue is empty, so we're done
  for(int j=0; j<nVerts; j++)             // reset flags
     vertexList[j].wasVisited = false;
  }  // end bfs()
// -------------------------------------------------------------
// returns an unvisited vertex adj to v -- ****WITH WEIGHT 1****
public int getAdjUnvisitedVertex(int v) {
    for (int j = 0; j < nVerts; j++)
        if (adjMat[v][j] == 1 && vertexList[j].wasVisited == false && edge_weight[v][j] == 1){
            //System.out.println("Vertex found with 1:"+ vertexList[j].label);
            return j;
        }
    for (int k = 0; k < nVerts; k++)
        if (adjMat[v][k] == 1 && vertexList[k].wasVisited == false && edge_weight[v][k] == 2){
            //System.out.println("Vertex found with 2:"+vertexList[k].label);
            return k;
        }
    return -1;
}  // end getAdjUnvisitedVertex()
   // -------------------------------------------------------------
}  
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
public class BFS{
public static void main(String[] args)
  {
  Graph theGraph = new Graph();
  theGraph.addVertex('A');    // 0  (start for bfs)
  theGraph.addVertex('B');    // 1
  theGraph.addVertex('C');    // 2

  theGraph.addEdge(0, 1,2);     // AB
  theGraph.addEdge(1, 2,1);     // BC
  theGraph.addEdge(2, 0,1);     // AD


  System.out.print("Visits: ");
  theGraph.bfs();             // breadth-first search
  System.out.println();
  }  // end main()
   }

The problem then is, that I don't know why BFS can work for the shortest path problem with edges of weight 1 or 2 as opposed to any edges of any weight.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks!

Edit: Here is the problem: You wish to find the shortest path from s to the rest of the vertices. This could be done using Dijkstra’s algorithm, but you need to use a breadth-first search strategy. You should be able to do this because any edge weight is either 1 or 2. Describe the changes to BFS that will solve your problem

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The significance of the edge weight limit to BFS is that it ensures that if there is an edge from A to B then there is no shorter path from A to B. The maximum weight of the AB edge is 2. The minimum total weight of a path from A to C to B is also 2.

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Thanks this helps! Any help on how to implement this into the BFS algorithm? –  Hackster Dec 2 '12 at 5:39

Because you are asking specifically for edge not visited and with a weight of 1 or 2:

/ returns an unvisited vertex adj to v -- ****WITH WEIGHT 1****
public int getAdjUnvisitedVertex(int v) {
    ...
        if (adjMat[v][j] == 1 && vertexList[j].wasVisited == false && 
            edge_weight[v][j] == 1            
    ...
        if (adjMat[v][k] == 1 && vertexList[k].wasVisited == false && 
            edge_weight[v][k] == 2)
   ...
} 

If you put edge_weight if weight different than 1 and 2 according to you actual code the method getAdjUnvisitedVertex will always return -1. Thus:

while( (v2=getAdjUnvisitedVertex(v1)) != -1 ){// get one,
        vertexList[v2].wasVisited = true;  // mark it
        displayVertex(v2);                 // display it
        theQueue.insert(v2);               // insert it
        } 

the computation inside the while will never be executed.

BFS it is use to find paths with the minimum number of edges from the start vertex. Thus, BFS finds shortest paths assuming that each edge has the same weight. Is one type of algorithm use for a special case of graph (non-weight graphs).

For find the shortest path on weight graph you have another group of algorithms like Dijkstra’s Algorithm and Prim for that matter.

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I understand that. This is my modified code. What I'm asking is why can BFS work with edges of 1 or 2? as opposed to not working with weights of any weight. –  Hackster Dec 2 '12 at 5:05
    
Yes except the weights will always be 1 or 2, so it will only return -1 if it cannot find an adjacent vertex. –  Hackster Dec 2 '12 at 5:13
    
@Hackster I understand now your point, i made a edit –  dreamcrash Dec 2 '12 at 5:21
    
@ dreamcrash Thanks for your help. The problem is I must use BFS. Here is the problem: You wish to find the shortest path from s to the rest of the vertices. This could be done using Dijkstra’s algorithm, but you need to use a breadth-first search strategy. You should be able to do this because any edge weight is either 1 or 2. Describe the changes to BFS that will solve your problem –  Hackster Dec 2 '12 at 5:28
1  
@Hackster Since, BFS find the minimum number of edges, and since you have weight with 1 and 2 you have guaranty that everytime you add a edge with weight 2 it will count two times –  dreamcrash Dec 2 '12 at 5:37

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