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I have a few questions about structs and pointers

For this struct:

typedef struct tNode_t {
    char *w;
} tNode;

How come if I want to change/know the value of *w I need to use t.w = "asdfsd" instead of t->w = "asdfasd"?

And I compiled this successfully without having t.w = (char *) malloc(28*sizeof(char)); in my testing code, is there a reason why tt's not needed?

Sample main:

int main()
{
    tNode t;
    char w[] = "abcd";
    //t.word = (char *) malloc(28*sizeof(char));
    t.word = w;
    printf("%s", t.word);
}

Thanks.

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closed as too localized by Mitch Wheat, djechlin, WhozCraig, Jonathan Leffler, Sgoettschkes Dec 2 '12 at 22:25

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2  
it compiles because you have a local copy already defined, no need to dynamically create it again. –  mattclemens Dec 2 '12 at 4:55
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

t->w is shorthand for (*t).w i.e. it only makes sense to use the arrow if t is a pointer to a struct.

Also, since the string you assigned is hard-coded (thus, determined at compile time), there's no need to dynamically allocate its memory at runtime.

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Take a look at this tutorial: http://pw1.netcom.com/~tjensen/ptr/ch5x.htm

struct tag {
char lname[20];      /* last name */
char fname[20];      /* first name */
int age;             /* age */
float rate;          /* e.g. 12.75 per hour */
};

kay, so we know that our pointer is going to point to a structure declared using struct tag. We declare such a pointer with the declaration:

struct tag *st_ptr;

and we point it to our example structure with:

st_ptr = &my_struct;

Now, we can access a given member by de-referencing the pointer. But, how do we de-reference the pointer to a structure? Well, consider the fact that we might want to use the pointer to set the age of the employee. We would write:

(*st_ptr).age = 63;

Look at this carefully. It says, replace that within the parenthesis with that which st_ptr points to, which is the structure my_struct. Thus, this breaks down to the same as my_struct.age.

However, this is a fairly often used expression and the designers of C have created an alternate syntax with the same meaning which is:

st_ptr->age = 63;
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How come if I want to change/know the value of *w I need to use t.w = "asdfsd" instead of t->w = "asdfasd"?

If your t is a pointer, you need to use t->w. Else you should use t.w.

in my testing code, is there a reason why tt's not needed?

In your code you have already set your t.word to point to the area storing your char w[] = "abcd";. So you don't need to malloc some memory for your t.word.

Another example where malloc is needed is:

tNode t;
t.word = (char *) malloc(28*sizeof(char));
strcpy(t.word, "Hello World");
printf("%s", t.word);
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How come if I want to change/know the value of *w I need to use t.w = "asdfsd" instead of t->w = "asdfasd"?

t is a tNode, not a pointer to tNode, so . is the appropriate accessor.

And I compiled this successfully without having t.w = (char *) malloc(28*sizeof(char)); in my testing code, is there a reason why tt's not needed?

This isn't needed because "abcd" is still in scope so w can just point to it. If you want w to point to persistent memory-managed contents, it will have to allocate its own memory as it would with this line.

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