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From a random php.net post:

If you are doing $whatever = null; then you are rewriting variable's data. You might get memory freed / shrunk faster, but it may steal CPU cycles from the code that truly needs them sooner, resulting in a longer overall execution time.

Apparently this is the undisputed truth so maybe someone would be so kind as to explain.

I mean, what, does unset magically not execute any assembly instructions whereas $whatever = null; does? The answer, as given, is about as useful as saying

$whatever = null resets the buffer and the L1 cache whereas unset clears the buffer and resets the L2 cache.

Techno mumbo jumbo doesn't constitute an answer.

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2  
I think it might be related to variables being values in PHP (yes, I said that: internally variables are objects). So there might be a difference between "setting the value of a variable (to null)" and "deleting a variable" in terms of cleanup .. but that is just wild speculation on my part ;) –  user166390 Dec 2 '12 at 7:04
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You are making it way complicated than it is. Assigning a var null means the variable is set with a value null. Unset makes the var non existant. –  itachi Dec 2 '12 at 7:11
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@itachi it could be answer ,..with bit more explanation –  obi NullPoiиteя kenobi Dec 2 '12 at 8:54
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

An important difference between both methods is that unset($a) also removes $a from the symbol table; for example:

$a = str_repeat('hello world ', 100);
unset($a);
var_dump($a);

Outputs:

Notice: Undefined variable: a in xxx
NULL

But when $a = null is used:

$a = str_repeat('hello world ', 100);
$a = null;
var_dump($a);

Outputs:

NULL

I ran the code through a benchmark as well and found that $a = null is roughly 6% faster than its unset() counterpart. It seems that updating a symbol table entry is faster than removing it.

Addendum

The other difference (as seen in this small script) seems to be how much memory is restored after each call:

echo memory_get_usage(), PHP_EOL;
$a = str_repeat('hello world ', 100);
echo memory_get_usage(), PHP_EOL;
// EITHER unset($a); OR $a = null;
echo memory_get_usage(), PHP_EOL;

When using unset() all but 64 bytes of memory are given back, whereas $a = null; frees all but 272 bytes of memory. I don't have enough knowledge to know why there's a 208 bytes difference between both methods, but it's a difference nonetheless.

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+1 nice answer ..... –  obi NullPoiиteя kenobi Dec 2 '12 at 8:54
    
As @Ashkan points out, when you are clearing many variables (> 80-ish, according to the link) unset() can be faster than = null as well as freeing more memory. –  Beetle 952580 Nov 26 at 11:52
    
@Beetle952580 That's interesting; admittedly I didn't test unsetting batches of variables, didn't think that would matter :) –  Ja͢ck Nov 26 at 11:53

Setting a variable to null assigns the value null to the variable. That means memory needs to be allocated where the null value (internally a zval) is stored and an entry into the symbol table needs to be made.

Unsetting a variable removes the entry for the variable from the symbol table, period.

It should be clear which is more expensive. Both actions may or may not trigger a garbage collection cycle immediately or later to clean up any values which may have been assigned to the variable previously.

BTW, when you try to use a non-existent (unset) variable, an error will be triggered and the value for the variable expression will be null. (Because, what else should PHP do? Every expression needs to result in some value.) A variable with null assigned to it is still a perfectly normal variable though.

var_dump($notHere);     -> NOTICE: Undefined variable notHere on line 1
                           NULL

$foo = null;
var_dump($foo);         -> NULL

unset($foo);
var_dump($foo);         -> NOTICE: Undefined variable foo on line 7
                           NULL
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+1 nice answer ..... –  obi NullPoiиteя kenobi Dec 2 '12 at 8:52

When using unset, memory usage and processing time is less.

http://php.net/manual/en/function.unset.php#105980

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