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I have a function that I pass an array into and an int into from my main function. I am doing operations to the array inside this new function, let's call it foo. In foo, I initialize another array with 52 cells all with 0. I do operations on the array that I passed from main, and transfer that data to the newly initialized array. I want to return the new array back to the main function. But of course, I can't return data structures like arrays. So I instead return an int pointer that points to this array. Inside the int main, I pass the pointer to have it point to various cells in the array. When I print the results of what the pointer is pointing to, it should either be pointing to 0 or an integer greater than 0. But instead, I get inconsistent results. For some reason, some of the values that SHOULD be 0, prints out garbage data. I've been trying to spot the bug for some time, but I just wanted a second hand look at it. Here is just the GENERAL idea for the code for this portion anyways...

int main(){
    int *retPtr;
    char input[] = "abaecedg";
    retPtr = foo(input, size);
    for(i=0; i<52; i++){
        // error displayed here
        printf("%d\n", *(retPr + i));
    }
}

int foo(char input[], int size)
{
    int arr[52] = {0};      // should initialize all 52 cells with 0.
    int i=0, value;         // looking for non-zero results in the end.        
    int *ptr = &arr[0];                        
    for(i=0; i<size; i++){
        if(arr[i] > 64 && arr[i] < 91){
            value = input[i] - 65;
            arr[value]++;
        }
    }
    return ptr;
}

Hopefully this makes sense of what I'm trying to do. In the foo function, I am trying to find the frequency of certain alphabets. I know this might be a bit cryptic, but the code is quite long with comments and everything so I wanted to make it as succinct as possible. Is there any possible reason why I'm getting correct values for some (numbers > 0, 0) and garbage values in the other?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The reason you get garbage back is that the array created in foo is allocated in foos stack frame, and you then return a pointer into that frame. That frame is discarded when foo returns.

You should allocate the array on the heap (using malloc and friends) if you want it to remain after foo returns. Don't forget to free() it when you're done with the array.

int main(){
    char input[] = "abaecedg";
    int retPtr[] = foo(input, size); //An array and a pointer is the same thing
    ...
    free(retPtr);
}

int *foo(char input[], int size)
{
    int arr[] = calloc(52*sizeof(int); // should initialize all 52 cells with 0.
    ...
    arr[value]++;
    ...
    return arr;
}

Another way is to let foo take an array as a parameter and work with that, in this way:

int main(){
    int ret[52] = {0};
    ...
    foo(input, size, ret);
    ...
}

void foo(char input[], int size, int *arr)
{
    ...
    arr[value]++;
    ...
    return; //Don't return anything, you have changed the array in-place
}

The reason this works is because an array is the exact same thing as a pointer, so you are really passing the array by reference into foo. arr will be pointing to the same place as ret, into the stack frame of main.

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Oh wow. That would make sense haha. I will try that right now and hopefully return with successful results. Just an additional question. If I chose the malloc method (still not comfortable with dynamic allocation), where and how should I use the free()? It can't be in foo because then I would free it before I can do additional operations with it on main(). –  Nopiforyou Dec 2 '12 at 7:40
    
You should free when you are done with the array. In this case you should free in main. –  Emil Vikström Dec 2 '12 at 7:43
    
Just for clarification, if I use the second method that you presented with void foo() and passing an additional array that already has the results, would we not run into the same problems as I originally did because I'm not using foo's local variables but a variable that I pass in as an input? Hence no issues with stack –  Nopiforyou Dec 2 '12 at 7:45
    
Just used second method and worked successfully! Thank you! –  Nopiforyou Dec 2 '12 at 7:50

In function foo the array arr is a local array, that is, allocated on the stack. You must not return any pointer of data allocated on the stack, since the stack is rewinded after you return from the function, and its content is no more guaratneed.

If you want to return an array you should allocate it on the heap using malloc, for example, and return the pointer malloc returned. But you will then have to free that memory somewhere in your program. If you fail to free it you will have what's called a "memory leak", which may or may not crash/disturb this program from running again, depending on your environment. A not clean situation, that's for sure.

That's why I consider C not so good for functional programing idioms, such as returning things from function (unless they are primitive types). I would achieve what you tried to do by passing another array to foo - an output array, companioned by a size variable, and fill that array.

Alternately, you could wrap the array within a struct and return that struct. Structs can be returned by value, in which case they are copied via the stack to the caller function's returned value.

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