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The program below is supposed to find the first all-zero row, if any, of an n × n matrix. Is this a correct approach to the problem, and is there another good structured approach to this code in C, or in any language in general? I'm trying to learn more about goto statements and appropriate uses/ alternatives to them. I appreciate any help!

int first_zero_row = -1; /* none */
int i, j;
for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++) {
        if (A[i][j]) goto next;
    }
    first_zero_row = i;
    break;
    next: ;
}
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5  
when goto decreases complexity and increases readability, it is appropriate, but in this case just use continue –  technosaurus Dec 2 '12 at 8:02
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm not against using goto in some situations, but I think this can be re-written like this:

for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++) {
        if (A[i][j]) break;
    }
    if (j==n) { /* the row was all zeros */
        first_zero_row = i;
        break;
    }
}
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Suppose aftr next: label some lines of code are there , will you able to execute which OP is executing in his case –  Omkant Dec 2 '12 at 8:02
    
@Omkant there isn't any, note the ; after next, the OP said the program is supposed find the first zeros row. and yes you can add those lines after the if block –  mux Dec 2 '12 at 8:03
    
Yeah that's fine... but I said if there is at least one line of code after next then I think this won't work... anyway you are right –  Omkant Dec 2 '12 at 8:05
    
This is not an extensible solution. You have to add 1 comparison for 1 nested loops. So what happen if you have 10? I would not prefer this one. –  Earth Engine Apr 22 '13 at 11:28
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What about using a little helper function to simplify the code in the loop:

bool is_zero_row(int* Row, int size)
{
    int j;

    for (j = 0; j < size; j++)
        if (Row[j] != 0)
            return false;

    return true;
}

and then

int first_zero_row = -1; /* none */
int i;
for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    if (is_zero_row(A[i], n))
    {
        first_zero_row = i;
        break;
    }
}
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1  
Yes, this is one alternative to goto for breaking out of multiple loops at once. Put every inner loop in a function. The reason it works is because the return statement actually is like a goto itself, that jumps to the end of the function. –  potrzebie Dec 2 '12 at 9:08
    
One advantage of a return statement over a goto is that you cannot misplace the label. Also, is_zero_row might be more readable than if(A[i][j]). –  Bo Persson Dec 2 '12 at 9:11
1  
This is my preferred alternative because "Extract function" is a good practice of "refactoring" –  Earth Engine Apr 22 '13 at 11:26
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First off: Yes, your approach looks correct to me. You could rewrite it like this:

int first_zero_row = -1; /* none */
int i, j;
for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    int all_zeroes = 1;
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++) {
        if (A[i][j]) {
            all_zeroes = 0;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (all_zeroes) {
        first_zero_row = i;
        break;
    }
}

but I think that's actually less clear than the goto version. In a language like Perl that provides loop labels, you could do this:

my $first_zero_row = -1;  # none
ROW:
for my $i (0 .. $n-1) {
    for my $j (0 .. $n-1) {
        next ROW if $A[$i][$j];
    }
    $first_zero_row = $i;
    last ROW;
}
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The Perl example is a nice alternative –  Joe Crawley Dec 3 '12 at 9:10
    
In compare to the function extraction solution, I found all those control structures seems "evil" to me because it mixes up different context of the control path. For example, I can easily say to run a function will require all its parameters being ready (an we can have preconditions and/or postconditions, invariants etc), but it would be hard in a complex program to say what is the precondition of a label. –  Earth Engine Apr 22 '13 at 11:38
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Your code looks quite readable to me. Indiscriminate witch-hunting of goto is not good. Go and read Donald E. Knuth’s Structured Programming with go to Statements for interesting thougts on the subject.

My version with goto, for maximum efficiency and quite readable too:

int i, j;
for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
        if (A[i][j]) goto not_this_row;
    goto row_found;
    not_this_row:
}
/* Not found case here */

row_found:
/* Found case, i is the first zero row. */
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You can use one variable which will work as flag. For if (A[i][j]) goto next; condition modify flag value to some other instead of goto next.

And then check that flag value later to do other operations , which is after next label in your case.

int flag = 0;
for ( i = 0; i < n; i++ ) {
    for ( j = 0; j < n; j++ ) {
        if ( A[i][j] ){
            flag = 1;
            break;
        }
    }
    if( flag == 1 ){
        // do your stuff 
        continue;
    }
    if( flag == 0 ){
        first_zero_row = i;
        break;
    }

NOTE : To remove goto from your code It may require you to adjust the position of some lines of code.

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@NPE : I also don't use goto ,because it makes code much complex to understand if there are 2 -3 goto in the same function –  Omkant Dec 2 '12 at 7:48
2  
Your code can be significantly slower that the OP's as it doesn't short-circuit. –  NPE Dec 2 '12 at 7:50
    
This code is bogus. It will always end with first_zero_row==0. –  kmkaplan Dec 2 '12 at 11:15
    
This is even worse than the accepted answer. 2 comparisons added. –  Earth Engine Apr 22 '13 at 11:30
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Since I've used my first goto to break out of nested loops in...well...ever, today, I'll weigh in on this. I felt bad about it so I read up a bit on why goto is considered evil.

The reason Dijkstra (and others) consider goto as evil is that code is built up in blocks where each block has preconditions and postconditions. A goto (or break) means that you cannot guarantee that a code block will generate a valid postcondition for the next block as precondition ( i.e. you cannot 'prove your code correct' since the break/goto may skip essential parts of the code block)

HOWEVER, the reason why I think goto is fine in your example is: You're actually setting up a fully valid postcondition (first_zero_row = -1 ...i.e.: "no all-zero row found") up front. So there is no chance that your block will go into an invalid postcondition state.

The issue of readability is another thing, though. Goto makes code rather unreadable. So for your particular example there may be better alternatives.

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In my opinion, ALL GOTO IS EVIL. If in any case you would need them, you'd better consider "Extract Method" refactoring.

The need to use "GOTO" is a very good indicator shows your method (or function) is too complicated that you should split it into different pieces.

For example, the given example of the question can be (and should be) refactored into:

bool is_zero_row(int *row, int size){
    for(i = 0; i<size; ++i){
        if(row[i]) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

bool find_zero_row_in_array(int **A, int rows, int row_size){
    int i,j;
    for(i = 0; i < rows; ++i) {
        if(is_zero_row(A[i], row_size)) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

...
if(find_zero_row_in_array(A, n, n)){
    //Found
} else {
    //Not found
}
....

This is far more flexible and readable than the original. At least we now have a function that can work for any arrays with different numbers of rows and columns, rather assume they are the same.

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1  
you clowns need to stop saying goto is evil. I ruined 2 years worth of embedded C routines because I was afraid of liberal use of goto because my CS teacher freshman year said DON'T EVER USE IT!!!!1 RAWR!!!!. It is perfect for state machines and GET OFF MY LAWN!!!11 –  Rancur3p1c Dec 16 '13 at 20:49
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