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mixing cout and printf for faster output

I'm using Microsoft Visual Studio 6.0.

The following program,

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "iostream.h"

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
printf("a");
printf("b");
printf("c");
return 0;
}

produces "abc".

While the following program,

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "iostream.h"

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
printf("a");
cout<<"b";
printf("c");
return 0;
}

produces "acb".

What's the problem? Can't I mix cout and printf in the same program?

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marked as duplicate by WhozCraig, casperOne Dec 6 '12 at 14:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Does sync_with_stdio do the trick? I've never used it. –  chris Dec 2 '12 at 7:46
    
@CaptainMurphy: No it is not. The semantics of mixing wide-narrow are unspecified, whereas the semantics of the above code are well defined and it must print "abc" unless sync_with_stdio(false) was called, which does not happen here. Basically MSVC6 is non standard conforming... –  ybungalobill Dec 2 '12 at 7:53

1 Answer 1

The standard says that:

When a standard iostream object str is synchronized with a standard stdio stream f, the effect of inserting a character c by

fputc(f, c);

is the same as the effect of

str.rdbuf()->sputc(c);

for any sequences of characters;

By default, unless you invoke sync_with_stdio(false), cout is synchronized with stdout. Therefore your second code snippet is equivalent to:

printf("a");
fputc(stdout, 'b')
printf("c");

Which must produce "abc" even on your implementation.

Bottom line: MSVC6 is not standard conforming, which is not a surprise as it is very old.

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"which is not a surprise as it is very old" - and anyways at Microsoft nobody gives a damn about standards. –  user529758 Dec 2 '12 at 8:03
1  
@H2CO3: Not exactly true... they do work on improving their C++ compiler. In particular you cannot say that, e.g., MSVC10 is not an improvement over MSVC6. –  ybungalobill Dec 2 '12 at 8:06
2  
@H2CO3 this was true for a long time. now MS is at eye level. according to our portability team MS was faster in implementing C++11 –  stefan Dec 2 '12 at 10:35
1  
@H2CO3: You are changing the subject of the discussion. No-one here talks about C, I judge MSVC purely as a C++ compiler. In particular because I do not care for C support. Today it is so close to being a conforming C++ compiler that it is hard to compare it to GCC. Yes both have bugs, but both are good too. –  ybungalobill Dec 2 '12 at 12:19
1  
@ H2CO3: my comment was addressing your comment (i cite) 'and anyways at Microsoft nobody gives a damn about standards.' everyone may jude –  stefan Dec 2 '12 at 12:24

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