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int i = 3;

Is there any performance difference between this code:

if(i == 2)
   DoA();
if(i == 3)
   DoB();
if(i == 4)
   DoC();

And this code:

if(i == 2)
   DoA();
else if(i == 3)
   DoB();
else if(i == 4)
   DoC();

I'm wondering if using optional ELSE affects how the CPU understands the code or not. I always think when we use the second approach, if i is 2 then the CPU does not check the other two conditions, but in the first approach although the first condition is true (i == 2) but the CPU does check the second and third conditions. Is this true?

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3  
It is true. Please don't suffer from premature optimisation, though. Do what makes sense, not what is faster. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 2 '12 at 8:58
    
@Mahdi jan, Code optimization may fix it for you, i think two codes above are same. –  pylover Dec 2 '12 at 8:59
    
@JanDvorak Thanks man, I just was curious, I'll never change the code, just want to know what's happening in the BlackBox. –  Mahdi Tahsildari Dec 2 '12 at 9:03
3  
Much more important is that in the seconds case you tell us, the readers, that you intend the cases to be mutually exclusive. In the first case, we would have to check if DoA() could possibly change i. –  Bo Persson Dec 2 '12 at 9:19
    
@BoPersson that's also a very clever point, thanks. But in my case i is stable. –  Mahdi Tahsildari Dec 2 '12 at 9:27
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Of course it does affect -- for better! It's totally the opposite of unecessary, since by using those elses the compiler will skip the other if-checks and get better performance.

But you shouldn't be worring about it, the difference in performance in your example is so minimal it's insignificant.

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Thanks @JumenTim for noticing the title mistake :) I edited the title –  Mahdi Tahsildari Dec 2 '12 at 9:15
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You should not decide this on the basis of performance. The two versions of the code mean different things. You should use the one that is correct.

For example:

if (s == null)
{
    // do something
    s = GetNewValue();
}
if (s == "")
{
    // do something else
}

Without an else, this code means:

  • Execute the first block if s is null
  • Then, if that block changed s to "" (or s was "" to begin with), execute the second block.

With an extra else before the second if, the code means:

  • Execute the first block if s is null.
  • Execute the second block if s wasn’t null to begin with and it is equal to "".

In cases where it makes no difference because the blocks don’t modify the variable you’re comparing against, use else because it makes your code’s meaning explicit.

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I got your point, but I was imagining a case that i does not change and the conditions are always different, that's when using/not using ELSE matters. Thanks. –  Mahdi Tahsildari Dec 2 '12 at 9:32
    
@mahditahsildari: Well that’s where my last sentence comes in. –  Timwi Dec 2 '12 at 9:34
    
Aha, I seeeeee. –  Mahdi Tahsildari Dec 2 '12 at 9:42
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Yes, use an else if, consider the following code:

if(predicateA){
  //do Stuff
}
if(predicateB){
  // do more stuff
}

or

if(predicateA){
  //do stuff 
}
else if(predicateB){
  //do stuff
}

In the second case if predicateA is true, predicateB (and any further predicates) will not need to be evaluated (and so the whole code will execute faster), whereas in the first example if predicateA is true, predicateB will still always be evaluated, and you may also get some unexpected suprises if predicateA and predicateB are not mutually exclusive.

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If they are mutually exclusive, like in the question, the compiler will realize this and generate the same code. –  Bo Persson Dec 2 '12 at 9:15
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Here is IL code of your two statements:

.method private hidebysig static void m1() cil managed
{
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
        [0] int32 i,
        [1] bool CS$4$0000)
    L_0000: nop 
    L_0001: ldc.i4.3 
    L_0002: stloc.0 
    L_0003: ldloc.0 
    L_0004: ldc.i4.2 
    L_0005: ceq 
    L_0007: ldc.i4.0 
    L_0008: ceq 
    L_000a: stloc.1 
    L_000b: ldloc.1 
    L_000c: brtrue.s L_0014
    L_000e: call void ConsoleApplication1.Program::DoA()
    L_0013: nop 
    L_0014: ldloc.0 
    L_0015: ldc.i4.3 
    L_0016: ceq 
    L_0018: ldc.i4.0 
    L_0019: ceq 
    L_001b: stloc.1 
    L_001c: ldloc.1 
    L_001d: brtrue.s L_0025
    L_001f: call void ConsoleApplication1.Program::DoB()
    L_0024: nop 
    L_0025: ldloc.0 
    L_0026: ldc.i4.4 
    L_0027: ceq 
    L_0029: ldc.i4.0 
    L_002a: ceq 
    L_002c: stloc.1 
    L_002d: ldloc.1 
    L_002e: brtrue.s L_0036
    L_0030: call void ConsoleApplication1.Program::DoC()
    L_0035: nop 
    L_0036: ret 
}

.method private hidebysig static void m2() cil managed
{
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
        [0] int32 i,
        [1] bool CS$4$0000)
    L_0000: nop 
    L_0001: ldc.i4.3 
    L_0002: stloc.0 
    L_0003: ldloc.0 
    L_0004: ldc.i4.2 
    L_0005: ceq 
    L_0007: ldc.i4.0 
    L_0008: ceq 
    L_000a: stloc.1 
    L_000b: ldloc.1 
    L_000c: brtrue.s L_0016
    L_000e: call void ConsoleApplication1.Program::DoA()
    L_0013: nop 
    L_0014: br.s L_003a
    L_0016: ldloc.0 
    L_0017: ldc.i4.3 
    L_0018: ceq 
    L_001a: ldc.i4.0 
    L_001b: ceq 
    L_001d: stloc.1 
    L_001e: ldloc.1 
    L_001f: brtrue.s L_0029
    L_0021: call void ConsoleApplication1.Program::DoB()
    L_0026: nop 
    L_0027: br.s L_003a
    L_0029: ldloc.0 
    L_002a: ldc.i4.4 
    L_002b: ceq 
    L_002d: ldc.i4.0 
    L_002e: ceq 
    L_0030: stloc.1 
    L_0031: ldloc.1 
    L_0032: brtrue.s L_003a
    L_0034: call void ConsoleApplication1.Program::DoC()
    L_0039: nop 
    L_003a: ret 
}

Looks like the generated IL(s) are NOT same.

EDIT 1

In method m2():

L_0014: br.s L_003a
.
.
.
L_0027: br.s L_003a

then method 'm2()' is faster.

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Does it mean that the compiler opts to redundantly check? That's kinda surprising. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 2 '12 at 9:09
    
Actually, no. They are not the same. The latter includes an unconditional jump after each if-block. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 2 '12 at 9:12
    
@Jan: Yes, Code Optimization do more tasks on code. sometimes IL code has many difference logic with original code. –  pylover Dec 2 '12 at 9:13
    
@JanDvorak I agree, if they are the same, so what's the jump doing there? they are different –  Mahdi Tahsildari Dec 2 '12 at 9:14
    
@Jan, Yes , you are true. I'll edit the post. –  pylover Dec 2 '12 at 9:14
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If the 'DoX' are statements like 'a = b'; then it's possible that the first one executes faster and it's still possible that the compiler doesn't figure out the best option for mutually exclusive comparisons.

In some architectures, those three comparison could be translated to:

 cmp a,2;
 movlt  b, c;
 moveq  c, d;
 movgt  e, f;

Iff these are very simple statements and the programmer helps a bit.

Some other practical ways to translate the problem for better performance is to use function pointers and make every step to guarantee, that there's no possibility of accessing the array out of range.

 void (*do)()[]={ doA, doB, doC };

 do[i]();  
 // mov eax, do[eax*4];
 // call [eax]
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