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My recent efforts to implement a thread/ mutex manager ended up in an 75% CPU load (4 core), while all four running threads were either in sleep or waiting for a mutex beeing unlocked.

The specific class is far too large for being posted here entirely, but I could narrow down the cause to the deadlock-safe acquiring of two mutexes

std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock1( mutex1, std::defer_lock );
std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock2( mutex2, std::defer_lock );
std::lock( lock1, lock2 );

Another part of the class uses a std::condition_variable with wait() and notify_one() on mutex1 for some code to be executed selectively at the same time.

The simple change to

std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock1( mutex1 );
std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock2( mutex2 );

brought the CPU usage down to normal 1-2%.

I Cant believe, the std::lock() function is that inefficient. Could this be a bug in g++ 4.6.3?

edit: ( example )

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>
#include <mutex>
#include <chrono>
#include <condition_variable>

std::mutex mutex1, mutex2;
std::condition_variable cond_var;

bool cond = false, done = false;


void Take_Locks()
    {
    while( !done )
        {
        std::this_thread::sleep_for( std::chrono::seconds( 1 ) );

        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock1( mutex1, std::defer_lock );
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock2( mutex2, std::defer_lock );
        std::lock( lock1, lock2 );

        std::this_thread::sleep_for( std::chrono::seconds( 1 ) );
        lock1.unlock();
        lock2.unlock();
        }
    }

void Conditional_Code()
    {
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock1( mutex1, std::defer_lock );
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock2( mutex2, std::defer_lock );

    std::lock( lock1, lock2 );
    std::cout << "t4: waiting \n";

    while( !cond )
        cond_var.wait( lock1 );

    std::cout << "t4: condition met \n";
    }

int main()
    {
    std::thread t1( Take_Locks ), t2( Take_Locks ), t3( Take_Locks );
    std::thread t4( Conditional_Code );

    std::cout << "threads started \n";
    std::this_thread::sleep_for( std::chrono::seconds( 10 ) );

    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock1( mutex1 );
    std::cout << "mutex1 locked \n" ;
    std::this_thread::sleep_for( std::chrono::seconds( 5 ) );

    std::cout << "setting condition/notify \n";
    cond = true;
    cond_var.notify_one();
    std::this_thread::sleep_for( std::chrono::seconds( 5 ) );

    lock1.unlock();
    std::cout << "mutex1 unlocked \n";
    std::this_thread::sleep_for( std::chrono::seconds( 6 ) );

    done = true;
    t4.join(); t3.join(); t2.join(); t1.join();
    }
share|improve this question
3  
You should post the code that contains the calls to wait() and notify_one() –  Ben Dec 2 '12 at 9:11
    
Complex locking schemes for multiple resource management that 'rely' on continually polling locks are hopeless, wasting CPU and/or wasting memory-bandwidth and/or introducing avoidable latency. If you are polling locks, you ARE doing it wrong. –  Martin James May 10 '14 at 15:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

On my machine, the following code prints out 10 times a second and consumes almost 0 cpu because most of the time the thread is either sleeping or blocked on a locked mutex:

#include <chrono>
#include <thread>
#include <mutex>
#include <iostream>

std::mutex m1;
std::mutex m2;

void
f1()
{
    while (true)
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> l1(m1, std::defer_lock);
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> l2(m2, std::defer_lock);
        std::lock(l1, l2);
        std::cout << "f1 has the two locks\n";
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(100));
    }
}

void
f2()
{
    while (true)
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> l2(m2, std::defer_lock);
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> l1(m1, std::defer_lock);
        std::lock(l2, l1);
        std::cout << "f2 has the two locks\n";
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(100));
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::thread t1(f1);
    std::thread t2(f2);
    t1.join();
    t2.join();
}

Sample output:

f1 has the two locks
f2 has the two locks
f1 has the two locks
...

I'm running this on OS X and the Activity Monitor application says that this process is using 0.1% cpu. The machine is a Intel Core i5 (4 core).

I'm happy to adjust this experiment in any way to attempt to create live-lock or excessive cpu usage.

Update

If this program is using excessive CPU on your platform, try changing it to call ::lock() instead, where that is defined with:

template <class L0, class L1>
void
lock(L0& l0, L1& l1)
{
    while (true)
    {
        {
            std::unique_lock<L0> u0(l0);
            if (l1.try_lock())
            {
                u0.release();
                break;
            }
        }
        std::this_thread::yield();
        {
            std::unique_lock<L1> u1(l1);
            if (l0.try_lock())
            {
                u1.release();
                break;
            }
        }
        std::this_thread::yield();
    }
}

I would be interested to know if that made any difference for you, thanks.

Update 2

After a long delay, I have written a first draft of a paper on this subject. The paper compares 4 different ways of getting this job done. It contains software you can copy and paste into your own code and test yourself (and please report back what you find!):

http://howardhinnant.github.io/dining_philosophers.html

share|improve this answer
    
On my machine, this example mostly prints a series of f1/f2 "...has the two locks" messages in no alternating order. (gcc 4.6.3) –  mac Feb 3 '13 at 13:15
    
@mac the behavior may differ between operating systems or c++ implementations. I see the behavior you describe with libstdc++ on linux but I see alternating f1/f2 with libc++ on OS X. –  bames53 Feb 5 '13 at 13:35
    
On OS X I see mostly alternating f1/f2, but not strictly. Every once in a while it breaks that pattern. More often if you shorten the sleep period. At any rate, the exact sequence of f1/f2 lock aquires is not really a pertinent point here. The main point is to dispute David Schwartz's assertion that std::lock can not be efficiently implemented. I.e. I strongly dispute: "There's no way the function can wait without spinning." And offer this experiment as evidence to the contrary, and invite anyone to post code that does spin. –  Howard Hinnant Feb 6 '13 at 0:02
    
@bames53 interesting, OS X seems to have more 'advanced' implementations. –  mac Feb 15 '13 at 20:04
2  
Using the updated ::lock() function brought the CPU usage down to acceptable values. –  mac Feb 16 '13 at 21:18

The std::lock() non-member function may cause Live-lock problem or performance degradation, it guarantee only "Never Dead-lock".

If you can determine "Lock order(Lock hierarchy)" of multiple mutexes by design, it's preferable to not use generic std::lock() but lock each mutexes in pre-determinate order.

Refer to Acquiring Multiple Locks Without Deadlock for more detail.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats essentially what I ended up with, until an efficient and deterministic (conditional) lock method emerges. –  mac Feb 3 '13 at 12:30

As the documentation says, [t]he objects are locked by an unspecified series of calls to lock, try_lock, unlock. There is simply no way that can possibly be efficient if the mutexes are held by other threads for a significant period of time. There's no way the function can wait without spinning.

share|improve this answer
5  
@David Schwartz: The spin can be very slow and non-cpu-intensive if after a failure there is both a yield and an attempt to lock/block on the mutex that previously failed the try_lock. Here is an efficient open source implementation: llvm.org/svn/llvm-project/libcxx/trunk/include/mutex . This implementation has been tested in high contention scenarios and been found to be very efficient. The premise of your answer is just false. The OS will park thread A if thread B holds any of the locks thread A needs, in the exact same manner as if we were only talking about a single mutex. –  Howard Hinnant Jan 25 '13 at 4:23
    
@HowardHinnant No OS I know of will park a ready-to-run thread if it has an available core on which to run it. (I don't think you understand the constraints here. There is no way "an unspecified series of calls to lock, try_lock, unlock" can be efficient, and that's what's specifically required here.) –  David Schwartz Jan 25 '13 at 5:03
3  
All of the modern OS's I know of will park a thread if it is not ready to run because it is blocked on a locked mutex. That's what a decent implementation of this algorithm does. I gave you a link to the source code to review. –  Howard Hinnant Jan 25 '13 at 14:54
    
I looked at that source code. It just repeats lock, trylock, release, yield. If there are more cores than ready-to-run threads, the yield is a no-op. That implementation is awful, and it's not the implementation's fault, the specification gives it no choice. Two threads running in lock step, one doing lock(a,b) and the other lock(b,a) can spin forever. –  David Schwartz Jan 25 '13 at 15:04
2  
Try to set it up. See if you can create the live-lock. –  Howard Hinnant Jan 25 '13 at 15:18

First I want to thank for all answers.

During the work on an example code, that reproduces the effect, I found the source of trouble.

The conditional part locks both mutexes, while it uses just one for the std::condition_variable::wait() function.

But I still wonder, what going on behind the scene, that produces such a high CPU load.

share|improve this answer
1  
See my answer. The thread is constantly locking one mutex, failing to lock the other, releasing the first mutex, failing again to lock the second, and repeating. –  David Schwartz Dec 3 '12 at 20:01

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