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I've started using transitions to "modernise" the feel of a site. So far, :hover transitions are working great. Now I'm wondering if it's possible to trigger a transition based on other things, such as when a class changes.

Here's the relevant CSS:

#myelem {
    opacity: 0;
    display: none;
    transition: opacity 0.4s ease-in, display 0.4s step-end;
    -ms-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-in, display 0.4s step-end;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-in, display 0.4s step-end;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-in, display 0.4s step-end;
}
#myelem.show {
    display: block;
    opacity: 1;
    transition: opacity 0.4s ease-out, display 0.4s step-start;
    -ms-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-out, display 0.4s step-start;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-out, display 0.4s step-start;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-out, display 0.4s step-start;
}

The JavaScript to trigger the change is:

document.getElementById('myelem').className = "show";

But the transition doesn't seem to be happening - it's just jumping from one state to the other.

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
Note that the -ms- prefix on transition is unnecessary; Internet Explorer 10 supports transition unprefixed, and Internet Explorer 9 does not support transitions. –  Charmander Dec 2 '12 at 18:50
    
Thanks for the info. I didn't realise IE10 supported the unprefixed name. –  Niet the Dark Absol Dec 2 '12 at 18:53
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It does work when you remove the display properties.

#myelem {
    opacity: 0;
    transition: opacity 0.4s ease-in;
    -ms-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-in;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-in;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-in;
}
#myelem.show {
    opacity: 1;
    transition: opacity 0.4s ease-out;
    -ms-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-out;
    -moz-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-out;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 0.4s ease-out;
}​

JSFiddle.

The reason for this is that only CSS properties with numbers can be transitioned. What do you think the "50% state" should be between "display: none;" and "display: block;"? Since that can't be calculated, you can't animate the display property.

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"only CSS properties with numbers can be transitioned" Not really... –  BoltClock Dec 2 '12 at 9:44
    
Could you backup your comment some more @BoltClock ? Looking at the specs, all the specified values have something to do with numbers (color, percentage, length, font-weight etc.) . –  MarcoK Dec 2 '12 at 13:07
1  
The word "number" is pretty vague, making that phrasing seem a little confusing. That said, one property that can be transitioned that doesn't use numeric values is visibility, although this doesn't result in an animated effect of course. –  BoltClock Dec 2 '12 at 13:14
    
I figured that using step-start and step-end would be okay, since there are no intermediary values. Fair enough then. –  Niet the Dark Absol Dec 2 '12 at 16:50
1  
A value that doesn't use numbers that can be transitioned are color and gradient values. For color values you can use words and the like. –  Joseph Jaber Aug 15 '13 at 1:07
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You cannot use the display property for transitioning between states.

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