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I want to program an internal(in C#) class, I was using the keyword 'Friend' in vb.Net. Now I want do the same in Java. What is the equivalent?

Friend Class NewClass

End Class
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no equivalent to friend in Java. The best you can do is to put the two classes in the same package, and make members of one class package-private (that is, without public, private or protected) to make them accessible to the other.

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There is not key word friend or equivalent to friend in Java. When I converted the VB code:

Friend Class NewClass

End Class

to C# code the conversion I got is:

internal class NewClass
{

}

So to make it equivalent java code two things you have to do:

1st Keep the class in same package where you want to access it. 2nd declare class without any access modifier:

class NewClass
{

}
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C#'s internal is equivalent to Java's default scope (which is its own scope).

Java does not have internal.

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In Visual Basic.NET, the Friend keyword speaks about accessibility. In C#, the equivalent keyword is internal.

In Java, there is no such keyword, but you can get effectively the same visibility with regard to package scope by leaving off any access specifier on the class declaration.

Taken from a side-by-side comparison between the C# and Java versions of the same class declarations, (I've also added a Visual Basic version for completeness) note the declarations of class B as well as A.Y, B.Y, C.Y and D.Y:

The Visual Basic Version:

Public Class A
    Public Shared X As Integer
    Friend Shared Y As Integer
    Private Shared Z As Integer
End Class
Friend Class B
    Public Shared X As Integer
    Friend Shared Y As Integer
    Private Shared Z As Integer
    Public Class C
        Public Shared X As Integer
        Friend Shared Y As Integer
        Private Shared Z As Integer
    End Class
    Private Class D
        Public Shared X As Integer
        Friend Shared Y As Integer
        Private Shared Z As Integer
    End Class
End Class

The C# Version:

public class A
{
    public static int X;
    internal static int Y;
    private static int Z;
}
internal class B
{
    public static int X;
    internal static int Y;
    private static int Z;
    public class C
    {
        public static int X;
        internal static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
    private class D
    {
        public static int X;
        internal static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
}

The Java Version:

public class A
{
    public static int X;
    static int Y;
    private static int Z;
}
class B
{
    public static int X;
    static int Y;
    private static int Z;
    public class C
    {
        public static int X;
        static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
    private class D
    {
        public static int X;
        static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
}

See also this comparison of Visual Basic and C# for reference.

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