Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an app that includes displaying some photos from a user's Facebook account. I'm currently using the fb_graph gem to do this (it's a Ruby project).

I can get the URLs no problem, but what I can't work out is whether the users will be able to see these photos, displayed on my page, if they're logged out of their Facebook account. URLs look like: http://sphotos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/<id>.jpg.

There's an obvious work around, though. I could append the access token I have for the user onto the URLs, so they have the same permissions to see the photos that I do: `http://sphotos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/<id>.jpg?access_token=<my_access_token>.

Questions like this one http://developers.facebook.com/docs/authentication/client-side/ suggest that it should be a last resort to use the access_token client-side, but I think I have to (as not all photos will be public).

And this question Facebook access token: server-side vs client-side flows says that because I'm getting the token server-side, it'll last for 60 days. So I want to be careful with how I use it.

Two questions, then: will this work for viewing the photos, and is there a better way that doesn't expose the access_token?

share|improve this question
    
Also curious to know whether I've misunderstood, and that in fact I don't need the access_token at all but can just display the images without it, and my users will be able to see them. That works for me locally, but I want to understand whether it'll work in production. –  Hbcdev Dec 4 '12 at 17:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
+100

Do not under any circumstances put the access token in any URLs of content on your page, or any resources you pull in from third party sites will be exposing users' access tokens in the referrer headers

The URL you retrieve for a photo from the API should be accessible directly without an access token

share|improve this answer

Can you access https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/168119_10150146071831729_5116892_n.jpg ? I think you can that's because its on the facebook cdn. It is not by accident that you get this link. In order to get to this step, you need to access the user's album and photos with an access token and "user_photos" permission (which you already seem to be doing).

Technically speaking you should be fine in production (unless facebook changes its cdn url's which seems highly unlikely).

EDIT
Forgot to mention. Exposing user's access token is not good practice (like Igy mentioned). A hacker would still need your app id and client secret to do malicious things with the access token but you don't want to take the unnecessary risk. Read this question for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
I can access that link -- can you explain what this proves? Are you saying that that URL is a temporary one generated by your access_token? It's also possible that the photo is simply a public one, unless you can expand on your explanation. Thanks. –  Hbcdev Dec 7 '12 at 9:23
    
1)This proves you can access fb cdn url without token. 2)The URL is not a temp one (until fb changes the cdn location) and doesn't change based on access token 3) Consider the album id 451318416382(this is my personal private album). You cannot access it directly without my access token. Now consider a photo from the same album here. You can access it right? This proves you don't need access token to access a url in fb cdn if you have the link to it. –  Karan Ashar Dec 7 '12 at 18:56
    
An attacker needs nothing but the access token in order to cause damage; do not under any circumstances have the access token in the document source –  Igy Dec 7 '12 at 19:36
    
Yes I stand corrected. Igy is right. See this question. I will update my answer. –  Karan Ashar Dec 7 '12 at 19:47

I havent yet understood the question properly yet.

For resources like : http://sphotos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/blah they are static urls, which doesnt change every now and then, and they dont need an access token for others to see. You will need an access_token to get the url.

Client-side generated tokens are valid for 60 days or is called Extended Expiry Access Tokens and you obviously must not risk your users' security by exposing the token.

Did I miss any part of your question?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.