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Can someone please explain how array is referenced by it's name, by prepending pointer and double pointer to its name like in the following code:

#include<stdio.h>

main()
{  
    int a[3][2];
    a[0][0]=15;
    a[0][1]=150;
    a[1][0]=115;
    a[1][1]=165;
    a[2][0]=135;
    a[2][1]=139;
    printf( "%u\n", a);
    printf( "%u\n", *a);
    printf( "%u\n", **a);
}
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Please explain your question better. I only see that the code is invalid (the first two printf statements). –  Jo So Dec 2 '12 at 14:30
    
possible duplicate of Is array name a pointer in C? –  WhozCraig Dec 2 '12 at 14:55

5 Answers 5

The first one

printf("%u\n",a);

prints the address of a, which is the same as the address of the first element.

The second one

printf("%u\n",*a);

dereferences a and gives the address of the first "row" of a

and the third one

printf("%u\n",**a);

dereferences the pointer to the first "row" of a and gives the value of the first element in this two dimensional array.

When you compile your example with warnings turned on, the compiler will already complain and so tell you about some of the types you use. When you give pointers as arguments to printf, you should use the format specifier %p

printf("%p\n",a);
printf("%p\n",*a);

Format specifier %u is for unsigned int, if you have int, it's better using specifier %d

printf("%d\n",**a);
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Please mention that it's incorrect to use %u for cases 1 and 2. –  Jo So Dec 2 '12 at 14:34
    
printf("%u\n",a/*a) should be printf("%p\n",a/*a) in the first 2 cases. It should be printf("%d\n",**a); in the last case. Please consider updating the answer to add this. –  axiom Dec 2 '12 at 14:34
1  
And, for pedantry, the pointers ought to be cast to void*. On platforms where pointers to different types have different sizes, that is actually important (but those platforms may be hypothetical). –  Daniel Fischer Dec 2 '12 at 14:40
    
@DanielFischer %p is for pointer addresses, there's no distinction between "different" pointers. So, I'm curious if you have a link or some source for this claim. –  Olaf Dietsche Dec 2 '12 at 14:59
    
7.21.6.1, the specification of fprintf formats: "p The argument shall be a pointer to void. The value of the pointer is converted to a sequence of printing characters, in an implementation-defined manner."; and in paragraph 9 of 7.21.6.1: "If any argument is not the correct type for the corresponding conversion specification, the behavior is undefined." Now, formalism aside, on platforms where pointers to all object types have the same size and representation, you can bet that the cast doesn't matter. But if sizes differ, the wrong number of bytes is read by printf. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 2 '12 at 15:11

both a and *a is pointer so printing this in formatted output as in printf() use %p as format specifier.

Otherwise you will get warning messages by your compiler that

warning: format ‘%x’ expects type ‘unsigned int’, but argument 2 has type ‘int (*)[2]’ warning: format ‘%x’ expects type ‘unsigned int’, but argument 2 has type ‘int *’

so try this:

printf("%p\n",a);
printf("%p\n",*a);

for third case **a is of type int so it's better to use %d or %i

printf("%d\n",**a);

According to C standard ,

ISO c99 standard : 7.19.6 Formatted input/output functions

9   If a conversion specification is invalid, the behavior is undefined.

    If any argument is not the correct type for the corresponding conversion 

    specification, the behavior is undefined.
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it is like if a is address than *a is value of a

enter image description here

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Except when it is the operand of the sizeof, _Alignof, or unary & operators, or is a string literal being used to initialize another array in a declaration, an expression of type "N-element array of T" will be converted ("decay") to an expression of type "pointer to T", and the value of the expression will be the address of the first element of the array.

In the first printf call, the expression a has type "3-element array of 2-element array of int"; by the rule above, the expression will be converted to type "pointer to 2-element array of int" (int (*)[2]) and its value is the same as &a[0].

In the second printf call, the expression *a has type "2-element array of int"; by the rule above, the expression is to converted to type "pointer to int" (int *), and its value will be the same as &a[0][0] (which is the same as &a[0] - the address of the first element of an array is the same as the address of the array itself).

In the third printf call, the expression **a has type int, and its value is whatever is stored at a[0][0] (15 in this case).

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An examination of types is instructive.

a has type int [3][2], i.e. an array of 3 arrays of 2 ints. However, array types cannot be assigned or passed in C. What is happening when you pass a to printf is that it degrades into a pointer to its first argument, i.e. &a[0], which has type int (*)[2], i.e. a pointer to an array of 2 ints. That's the address that you see.

(Of course, the address of the first argument of an array is also the same as the address of the array itself, so if you did printf("%u", &a);, you would see the same address value (but the type would be different -- &a would have type int (*)[3][2]).)

Next, *a. You can only dereference a pointer, so a is first degraded into a pointer (&a[0]), and then dereferenced (*&a[0]). The result is a[0], the first element of a. a[0] has type int [2], i.e. array of 2 ints. Again as above, arrays cannot be passed, so when you pass it to printf, this is degraded into a pointer to its first argument i.e. &a[0][0], which has type int *, pointer to int. That's the address that you see second. Again, it will be the same address as above since the address of a[0] is the same as the address of its first element, a[0][0] (but the type is different).

Finally, you have **a. As explained above, *a is a, degraded, then dereferenced. Remember above that *a has type int [2], an array type. Like with a, when you dereference that, it implicitly degrades it into a pointer before dereferencing it. So **a is a, degraded, dereferenced, degraded, and dereferenced again. A more explicit description of what is happening is *&(*&a[0])[0]. The end result is a[0][0], which has type int.

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