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I need a quick easy way to get a string from a file in standard C++. I can write my own, but just want to know if there is already a standard way, in C++.

Equivalent of this if you know Cocoa:

NSString *string = [NSString stringWithContentsOfFile:file];
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7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

We can do it but it's a long line :

#include<fstream>
#include<iostream>
#include<iterator>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    // The one-liner
    string fileContents(istreambuf_iterator<char>(ifstream("filename.txt")), istreambuf_iterator<char>());

    // Check result
    cout << fileContents;
}

Edited : use "istreambuf_iterator" instead of "istream_iterator"

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You just used the ',' operator, its essentially just like putting a bunch of statements with a semicolon between them on one line. But even with that, it beats mine below by a line, nice. –  Doug T. Sep 26 '08 at 1:16
    
If you use an istreambuf_iterator (see Martin York's comment on my post) you can forget the noskipws. –  Doug T. Sep 26 '08 at 1:17
    
Another comment, ifstream is a temporary, can you ensure it won't close while we still have istream_iterators to it? Would the evaluation of this be compiler specific. –  Doug T. Sep 26 '08 at 1:20
    
@Doug T : I don't use the ',' operator. Read the code again. I only use the string constructor with two parameters. –  Rexxar Sep 28 '08 at 12:58
2  
@Doug T : Temporary Objects are destroyed after the evaluation of the full-expression that is just before the semi-colon. –  Rexxar Sep 28 '08 at 13:08

Its almost possible with an istream_iterator (3 lines!)

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    ifstream file("filename.txt");
    string fileContents;

    copy(istreambuf_iterator<char>(file),
              istreambuf_iterator<char>(),
              back_inserter(fileContents));
}

Edited - got rid of intermediate string stream, now copies straight into the string, and now using istreambuf_iterator, which ignores whitespace (thanks Martin York for your comment).

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Put that in its own function and now you've got a one-liner. Just call that function. –  Zooba Sep 25 '08 at 23:07
    
Why not use istreambuf_iterator<char>(). It does not skip white space. –  Loki Astari Sep 25 '08 at 23:56
    
@Martin York - thanks, I was actually trying to search for that, but couldn't think of it. –  Doug T. Sep 26 '08 at 1:12

The standard C++ library doesn't provide a function to do this.

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Best answer. Sure, it CAN be done, but it's a mess. Much better to accept it isn't there and write your own. A single function call will definitely be a one-liner. –  Instance Hunter Apr 29 '09 at 16:42

Best I can do is 5 lines:

#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

ifstream f("filename.txt");
f.seekg(0, ios::end);
vector<char> buffer(f.tellg());
f.seekg(0, ios::beg);
f.read(&buffer[0], buffer.size());
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Is the f.seekg() trick always correct about the length of the file? What about CRLF conversion on Windows? –  Adam Mitz Sep 26 '08 at 0:22
    
I guess you could open the file in binary mode so it's not an issue. –  Adam Pierce Sep 26 '08 at 1:31

How about:

#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main( void )
{
  stringstream os(stringstream::out);
  os << ifstream("filename.txt").rdbuf();
  string s(os.str());
  cout << s << endl;
}
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If you do it like the following (but properly wrapped up nicely unlike below), you can read in the file without worrying about a 0x1A byte in the file (for example) cutting the reading of the file short. The previously suggested methods will choke on a 0x1A (for example) in a file.


#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <vector>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    FILE* in = fopen("filename.txt", "rb");
    if (in == NULL) {
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    if (fseek(in, 0, SEEK_END) != 0) {
        fclose(in);
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    const long filesize = ftell(in);
    if (filesize == -1) {
        fclose(in);
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    vector<unsigned char> buffer(filesize);
    if (fseek(in, 0, SEEK_SET) != 0 || fread(&buffer[0], sizeof(buffer[0]), buffer.size(), in) != buffer.size() || ferror(in) != 0) {
        fclose(in);
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    fclose(in);
}

But, yeh, it's not an already-implemented 1-liner though.

Edit: 0x1A wasn't a good example as ios_base::binary will cover that. However, even then C++ streams often give me trouble when reading in png files all at once with .read(). Using the C way works better. Just can't remember a good example to show why. It was probably with .read()ing a binary file in blocks in a loop instead that can be a problem with C++ streams. So, disregard this post.

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std::string temp, file; std::ifstream if(filename); while(getline(if, temp)) file += temp;

It's not a short or single-statement line, but it is one line and it's really not that bad.

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