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I have 2 tables, items and members :

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `items` (
`id` int(5) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
`member` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `members` (
  `id` int(5) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

What if, for example I have a record inside items, such as

INSERT INTO  `test`.`items` (
`id` ,
`name` ,
`member`
)
VALUES (
NULL ,  'xxxx',  '1, 2, 3'
);

in members :

INSERT INTO `members` (`id`, `name`) VALUES
(1, 'asdf'),
(2, 'qwert'),
(3, 'uiop'),
(4, 'jkl;');

and I'd like to display items.member data with members.name, something like 1#asdf, 2#qwert, 3#uiop??

I've tried the following query,

SELECT items.id, items.name, GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT_WS('#', members.id, members.name) ) as member

FROM `items` 
LEFT JOIN members AS members on (members.id = items.member)
WHERE items.id = 1

But the result is not like I expected. Is there any other way to display the data via one call query? Because I'm using PHP, right now, i'm explode items.member and loop it one by one, to display the members.name.

share|improve this question
    
Can you show us your item table? –  bonCodigo Dec 2 '12 at 14:58
    
Can you change the schema of your database? –  kmkaplan Dec 2 '12 at 15:00
    
@bonCodigo my items table is just contain one record, like above –  thom Dec 2 '12 at 15:09
    
@kmkaplan, what change? –  thom Dec 2 '12 at 15:10
    
@thorn the one described by eggyal (+1 to his answer). –  kmkaplan Dec 2 '12 at 16:08
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could look into using FIND_IN_SET() in your join criteria:

FROM items JOIN members ON FIND_IN_SET(members.id, items.member)

However, note from the definition of FIND_IN_SET():

A string list is a string composed of substrings separated by “,” characters.

Therefore the items.member column should not contain any spaces (I suppose you could use FIND_IN_SET(members.id, REPLACE(items.member, ' ', '')) - but this is going to be extremely costly as your database grows).

Really, you should normalise your schema:

CREATE TABLE memberItems (
  item_id   INT(5) NOT NULL,
  member_id INT(5) NOT NULL,
  FOREIGN KEY   item_id REFERENCES   items (id),
  FOREIGN KEY member_id REFERENCES members (id)
);

INSERT INTO memberItems
  (item_id, member_id)
SELECT items.id, members.id
FROM   items
  JOIN members ON FIND_IN_SET(members.id, REPLACE(items.member,' ',''))
;

ALTER TABLE items DROP member;

This is both index-friendly (and therefore can be queried very efficiently) and has the database enforce referential integrity. Then you can do:

FROM items JOIN memberItems ON memberItems.item_id = items.id
           JOIN members     ON members.id = memberItems.member_id

Note also that it's generally unwise to use GROUP_CONCAT() to combine separate records into a string in this fashion: your application should instead be prepared to loop over the resultset to fetch each member.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your answer. Indeed, the normal database, should be like memberItems. But, because this is not normal, so I'm trying to find a way to make this thing happen. FYI, I have 1k line items in real, that it will take some time if I have to split it. I'll deepen the ref. –  thom Dec 2 '12 at 15:18
    
@thom: See my edit above, which shows automatic population of memberItems from your existing data. –  eggyal Dec 2 '12 at 15:22
    
Then it works now :) Thank you for your assistance –  thom Dec 2 '12 at 17:07
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Please take a look at this sample:

SQLFIDDLE

Your query seems to work for what you have mentioned in the question... :)

SELECT I.ID, I.ITEM,
GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT("#",M.ID,
M.NAME, " ")) AS MEMB

FROM ITEMS AS I
LEFT JOIN MEMBERS AS M
ON M.ID = I.MID
WHERE i.id = 1
;

EDITTED ANSWER This query will not work for you¬ as your schema doesn't seem to have any integrity... or proper references. Plus your memeber IDs are delimtted by a comma, which has been neglected in this answer.

share|improve this answer
    
The items table in your sqlfiddle is completely different to that given in the question, which has a member column containing a string (apparently) of member IDs delimited by commas... –  eggyal Dec 2 '12 at 15:15
    
@eggyal +1 for yours. I figured it out with a surprise when you pointed that he is adding member ID as into items as a comma delimitted string.....mine only works for normalize situations... –  bonCodigo Dec 2 '12 at 15:26
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