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I've been working on some scala code that was compiling fine, but somehow I've broken the implicit conversions and I can't work out what I've done wrong. Boiling it down to a very simple case, this code doesn't compile and the reason seems to be that I'm not importing the implicit conversions between Double and Numeric[Double]:

import scala.math.Numeric
import scala.math.Numeric._
import scala.math.Numeric.Implicits._
import Ordering.Implicits._

object ImplicitNumericConversions {
  val v: Numeric[Double] = 3.0
}

I can fix this easily enough by providing my own function:

import scala.math.Numeric

object ImplicitNumericConversions {
  def convertDoubleToNumeric(d: Double)(implicit num: Numeric[Double]): Numeric[Double] = num

  val v: Numeric[Double] = convertDoubleToNumeric(3.0)
}

If I make the conversion function implicit then I get what I'm looking for:

import scala.math.Numeric

object ImplicitNumericConversions {

  implicit def convertDoubleToNumeric(d: Double)(implicit num: Numeric[Double]): Numeric[Double] = num

  val v: Numeric[Double] = 3.0
}

... but why don't the imports from scala.math.Numeric do this for me?

The actual problem that I'm working on looks like this:

class NumericRange[T <% Numeric[T]](val lower: T, val upper: T) { ... }

object NumericRange {

  def apply[T](lower: T, upper: T)(implicit num: Numeric[T]) = {
    import num._
    new NumericRange[T](lower, upper)
  }
}

... where the line creating the new NumericRange does not compile with these errors:

Multiple markers at this line
    - No implicit view available from T => scala.math.Numeric[T].
    - not enough arguments for constructor NumericRange: (implicit evidence$1: T => scala.math.Numeric[T])org.reductio.rtree.NumericRange[T]. Unspecified value parameter 
     evidence$1.
    - not enough arguments for constructor NumericRange: (implicit evidence$1: T => scala.math.Numeric[T])org.reductio.rtree.NumericRange[T]. Unspecified value parameter 
     evidence$1.
    - No implicit view available from T => scala.math.Numeric[T].
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Numeric is a type class, which means you don't work with instances of Numeric[Double] in this way, but rather that you have a single implicit Numeric[Double] in scope that specifies how to perform numeric operations on Double (see my answer here for a related discussion of Ordering).

So you're looking for an implicit Numeric[T], not a T => Numeric[T]. And fortunately there is one of those in scope for Double, so you can just write:

class NumericRange[T: Numeric](val lower: T, val upper: T) { ... }

Or:

class NumericRange[T](val lower: T, val upper: T)(implicit
  ev: Numeric[T]
) { ... }

The "context bound" in the first is just syntactic sugar for the implicit argument in the second.

share|improve this answer
    
That solved the issue for NumericRange. I tried applying the same technique to my OrderedRange implementation. Using an (implicit ev: Ordering[T]) worked in the same way. I couldn't get (implicit ev: Ordered[T]) to see the comparison operators, so there is another puzzle to solve on that one, but I'll leave that for another question. Amazing answer - thank you. –  richj Dec 2 '12 at 17:29

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