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I need to match what's in between ### and ###, now my regex I came up with "works" but I also pick up content with new line at the beginning and at end, with very complicate my life.

This is my regex:

(?<=\#\#\#)[\w\W]*?(?=\#\#\#)

I wonder can I match only content, without new line.

Some sample text:

###
stackoverflow.com - penguin;stackoverflow;html;nospin
http://stackoverflow.com
Writing the perfect question
How to ask questions the smart way
Help vampires
How to ask a question
###
stackoverflow.com - pyramid;stackoverflow;bb;spin
http://stackoverflow.com
Writing the perfect question
How to ask questions the smart way
Help vampires
How to ask a question
###
stackoverflow;stackoverflow;wiki;nospin
http://stackoverflow.com
Writing the perfect question
How to ask questions the smart way
Help vampires
How to ask a question
###
stackoverflow;stackoverflow;bb;spin
http://stackoverflow.com
Writing the perfect question
How to ask questions the smart way
Help vampires
How to ask a question
###
share|improve this question
    
Just strip the newlines from your match, what is the problem? –  Asad Dec 2 '12 at 15:43
    
I suggest this isn't a good use of regexes as it obscures what you're trying to do. Regexes are very good with individual lines of text, but get very complex when you're dealing with blocks of text. What language are you using? It's probably better to read the lines yourself into an array and then when you hit ### process the lines you've read. –  Andy Lester Dec 2 '12 at 15:46
    
I'm quite very limited in this thing when I'm working with it, something called ZennoPoster - its shitty little framework basically. –  Carol Ryals Dec 2 '12 at 15:48

1 Answer 1

You can try adding newlines to the lookahead/behind assertions:

(?<=###\n)[\w\W]*?(?=\r?\n###)

That should keep them out of the regex match.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, I was trying to do it like (?<=###\n)[\w\W]*?(?=###\n) but didn't worked, you saved me a lot of hassle. Thanks! –  Carol Ryals Dec 2 '12 at 15:45
1  
@CarolRyals you can show your appreciation for Kyle's effort by accepting his answer (ticking the check mark next to the answer). That will give him some reputation (and a little bit to you as well) and will also show future visitors that (and how) your problem has been solved. –  Martin Büttner Dec 2 '12 at 16:29
    
@Kyle you should note that this will not work in a whole bunch of regex engines, because the lookbehind is of variable-length. Java for instance will allow it because there is a finite number (2) of fixed-length possibilities inside the lookbehind. But Perl for instance, will choke on this. Also, while you are trying to be platform independent, using \r?\n, going all the way would mean (?:\n|\r\n?) ;) –  Martin Büttner Dec 2 '12 at 16:32
    
@m.buettner those are great points, I was not aware of the lookbehind limitation. Thanks! –  Kyle Burton Dec 2 '12 at 16:59
    
@KyleBurton you can mimick it for fixed-length lookbehinds, of course: (?:(?<=###\n)|(?<=###\r)|(?<=###\r\n)). It's ugly but it does the trick. I also think you could have kept your answer as it was, since it seems to solve the problem for the OP (e.g. because he is using an engine that supports it). I just wanted to add it as a general note of caution for future visitors, since the question is not engine-specific. –  Martin Büttner Dec 2 '12 at 17:03

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