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I'm trying to learn AngularJS. My first attempt to get new data every second worked:

'use strict';

function dataCtrl($scope, $http, $timeout) {
    $scope.data = [];

    (function tick() {
        $http.get('api/changingData').success(function (data) {
            $scope.data = data;
            $timeout(tick, 1000);
        });
    })();
};

When I simulate a slow server by sleeping the thread for 5 seconds it waits for the response before updating the UI and setting another timeout. The problem is when I rewrote the above to use Angular modules and DI for module creation:

'use strict';

angular.module('datacat', ['dataServices']);

angular.module('dataServices', ['ngResource']).
    factory('Data', function ($resource) {
        return $resource('api/changingData', {}, {
            query: { method: 'GET', params: {}, isArray: true }
        });
    });

function dataCtrl($scope, $timeout, Data) {
    $scope.data = [];

    (function tick() {
        $scope.data = Data.query();
        $timeout(tick, 1000);
    })();
};

This only works if the server response is fast. If there's any delay it spams out 1 request a second without waiting for a response and seems to clear the UI. I think I need to use a callback function. I tried:

var x = Data.get({}, function () { });

but got an error: "Error: destination.push is not a function" This was based on the docs for $resource but I didn't really understand the examples there.

How do I make the second approach work?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 70 down vote accepted

You should be calling the tick function in the callback for query.

function dataCtrl($scope, $timeout, Data) {
    $scope.data = [];

    (function tick() {
        $scope.data = Data.query(function(){
            $timeout(tick, 1000);
        });
    })();
};
share|improve this answer
2  
Excellent, thanks. I didn't know you could put the callback there. That solved the spamming issue. I also moved the data assignment to inside the callback which solved the UI clearing problem. –  David Dec 2 '12 at 17:25
1  
Glad to be able to help! If this solved the problem, you can accept this answer so that other later can also benefit from it. –  abhaga Dec 2 '12 at 17:40
1  
Assuming the above code is for pageA and controllerA. How do i stop this timer when I navigate to pageB and controllerB ? –  Varun Verma Nov 21 '13 at 10:46
2  
The process for stopping a $timeout is explained here docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.$timeout. Basically, the $timeout function returns a promise which you need to assign to a variable. Then listen for when that controller gets destroyed: $scope.$on('destroy', fn());. In the callback function call $timeout's cancel method and pass in the promise you saved: $timeout.cancel(timeoutVar); The $interval docs actually have a better example (docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.$interval) –  Justin Lucas Jan 15 '14 at 0:57
    
@JustinLucas, just in case it should be $scope.$on('$destroy', fn()); –  Tomato Jul 1 '14 at 2:18

More recent versions of angular have introduced $interval which works even better than $timeout for server polling.

var refreshData = function() {
    // Assign to scope within callback to avoid data flickering on screen
    Data.query({ someField: $scope.fieldValue }, function(dataElements){
        $scope.data = dataElements;
    });
};

var promise = $interval(refreshData, 1000);

// Cancel interval on page changes
$scope.$on('$destroy', function(){
    if (angular.isDefined(promise)) {
        $interval.cancel(promise);
        promise = undefined;
    }
});
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5  
-1, I don't think $interval is suitable, because you can't wait for the server response before sending the next request. This might result in to many requests when the server has a high latency. –  Treur Jan 29 '14 at 16:17
3  
@Treur: While that seems to be conventional wisdom these days, I'm not sure I agree. In most cases I'd rather have a more resilient solution. Consider the case where a user goes offline temporarily or the extreme of your case where the server doesn't respond to a single request. The UI will stop updating for users of $timeout since a new timeout will not be set. For users of $interval, the UI will pickup where it left off as soon as connectivity is restored. Obviously picking sane delays is important as well. –  Bob Jan 30 '14 at 2:58
1  
I think it is more convenient, but not resilient. (A toilet in my bedroom is also very convenient at night, but eventually it will start smelling bad ;) ) When retrieving actual data using $interval you ignore the servers result. This lacks a method to inform your user, facilitate data integrity or in short: manage your application state in general. However, you could use common $http interceptors for this and cancel the $interval when this happens. –  Treur Jan 30 '14 at 8:34
1  
If using $q promises, you can simply use the finally callback to make sure polling continues whether the request fails or not. –  Grand Master T Apr 25 '14 at 18:48
5  
A better alternative would be to handle not just the success event, but also the error event. This way you can try the request again if it fails. You might even do it at a different interval... –  Peanut Oct 16 '14 at 14:41

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