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I yesterday came across a question on SO, that wanted to dynamically allocate a 2-D array in C.

One of the answers was to allocate it this way:

int (*place)[columns] = malloc(rows * sizeof *place);

This apart from being beautiful, brought a question to my head. The question goes below:

Following is the code in which i allocate a 4x4

    int (*arr)[4] = (int (*)[4]) malloc(4 * sizeof *arr);
    printf("%d\n", sizeof arr);                 //Dynamic 2-D array by above method

    int **arr1 = (int**) malloc(4 * sizeof(int*));
    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
            arr1[i] = (int *) malloc(sizeof(double));
    printf("%d\n", sizeof arr1);                          //Usual dynamic 2-D array

    int *arr2 = (int*) malloc(4 * sizeof(int));
    printf("%d\n", sizeof arr2);                          //Dynamic 1-D array

The usual output is:

4
4
4

However, if i try to print sizeof *arr, sizeof *arr1 and sizeof *arr2, the output is:

16
4
4

I don't understand why this is happening. Any idea why the output for sizeof *arr is 16? How is the memory being being allocated in the first case?

Also, when i try to print the address of arr and *arr, both the printed values are same. *arr means "value at" arr. So does that mean arr stores its own address, i.e., it is pointing to itself (which i don't think is possible)? Am slightly confused. Any idea where am I going wrong?

Thanks for your help!

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address of arr and *arr is the same because address of first element in your array is the same as address of beginning of first row. Nothing weired in that. –  Blood Dec 2 '12 at 16:32
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

However, if I try to print sizeof *arr, sizeof *arr1 and sizeof *arr2, I get 16, 4, and 4.

where:

int (*arr)[4];
int **arr1;
int *arr2;

You must be working on a 32-bit machine, not a 64-bit machine.

The type of arr is 'pointer to an array of 4 int'. When you dereference it, you get an 'array of 4 int'. When passed to sizeof, the array is of size 16 (4 * sizeof(int)). Most of the time, when you reference an array, the type is adjusted to 'pointer to zeroth element of the array', but sizeof() is the primary exception to that rule; it sees an array as an array and returns the size of the whole array.

The type of arr1 is 'pointer to pointer to int'. When you dereference it, you get a 'pointer to int'. When passed to sizeof, the pointer is of size 4 (sizeof(int *)).

The type of arr2 is 'pointer to int'. When you dereference it, you get an int. When passed to sizeof, the int is of size 4.


Okay! I get most of it. But ... why isn't the output 16 when I do sizeof arr2?

As James noted in his comment:

because sizeof(arr2) reduces to sizeof(int*) which on a 32-bit machine is 4.

That is, arr2 is a pointer; the size of a pointer is 4 on a 32-bit machine.

Also, arr is a 'pointer to an array of 4 int', i.e., a single pointer. Then how do I get a 4×4 matrix.

You can use either of these:

int mat1[4][4];
int (*mat2)[4][4];

The first is a straight-forward 4×4 matrix. The result of sizeof(mat1) will be 64 on a 32-bit machine (and most 64-bit machines, as it happens).

The second is a pointer to a 4×4 matrix of int. The result of sizeof(mat2) will be 4 on a 32-bit machine; mat2 is a pointer (to a 4×4 matrix of int), so it is of size 4, the same as every other object pointer (and, in practice, the same size as every function pointer, though the C standard does not guarantee that function pointers and object pointers are the same size; POSIX does guarantee that, though).

The result of sizeof(*mat2) is the size of the object that mat2 points at, which is a 4×4 matrix of int, so the size is 64 again.

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Okay! I get most of it. But you say: " Most of the time, when you reference an array, the type is adjusted to 'pointer to zeroth element of the array', but sizeof() is the primary exception to that rule". Then why isn't the output 16 when i do a sizeof arr2? –  sleekFish Dec 2 '12 at 16:41
    
@shrey347 because sizeof(arr2) reduces to sizeof(int*) which on a 32-bit machine is 4 –  James Dec 2 '12 at 16:43
    
Also, arr is a 'pointer to an array of 4 int', i.e., a single pointer. Then how do i get a 4x4 matrix. Sorry if this seems silly!! –  sleekFish Dec 2 '12 at 16:44
    
@shrey347: arr is a pointer to the first element of a 4x4 array of arrays. However, given a pointer to the first element of an array, you don't know (and cannot find out) how big the array is. –  newacct Dec 2 '12 at 22:01
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In a 32 bit system it needs 4 bytes or 32 bit to identify each memory address uniquely. A pointer is nothing just the holder of the address. so it takes 4 byte. In the first case arr is an array of pointer of length 4. so it takes 4*4 =16 bytes. in the other two case arr1 and arr2 are just a single pointer. so they take 4 bytes.

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