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This is a snippet of Java code:

static {        
    ture = 9;       
}
static int ture;
{ // instance block 
    System.out.println(":"+ture+":");           
}

How is that it compiles at all? Declaration of variable 'ture' has been performed after initialization. As far as I know static blocks and fields have been executed in the order they appear.

And now why is that value 9 within instance block has been printed 3 times? By the way, the instance of the class has been created 3 times. That is not a homework, I am learning Java for certification.

share|improve this question
    
There isn't enough information in your quoted code to answer your second question. In any case, on SO it's best to ask one question per question. – T.J. Crowder Dec 2 '12 at 16:37
    
I don't really now what else I could add in order to make the second question more complete. There is only main method besides the above code and that is it. – uml Dec 2 '12 at 16:42
    
@ uml: You could add a complete class definition (like, for instance, the one in my answer), and show how you're instantiating it, since the instance initializer isn't run at all if you never create any instances. – T.J. Crowder Dec 2 '12 at 16:43
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Regarding your first question, static blocks are indeed processed in the order in which they appear, but declarations are processed first, before the static blocks are. Declarations are processed as part of the preparation of the class (JLS §12.3.2), which occurs before initialization (JLS §12.4.2). For learning purposes, the entire JLS §12 may be useful, as well as JLS §8, particularly §8.6 and JLS §8.7. (Thank you to Ted Hopp and irreputable for calling out those sections.)

There isn't enough information in your quoted code to answer your second question. (In any case, on SO it's best to ask one question per question.) But for instance:

public class Foo {
    static {     
        ture = 9;   
    }

    static int ture;

    {   // instance block   
        System.out.println(":"+ture+":");

    }

    public static final void main(String[] args) {
        new Foo();
    }
}

...only outputs :9: once, because only one instance has been created. It doesn't output it at all if you remove the new Foo(); line. If you're seeing :9: three times, then it would appear that you're creating three instances in code you haven't shown.

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You may want to add a pointer to specific part of JLS to make this truly fulfilling ;) – Victor Sorokin Dec 2 '12 at 16:39
    
OK, I get it. 3 instances. I have lots of garbage code, did not notice that I have been creating 3 instances in main method. – uml Dec 2 '12 at 16:47
    
@uml: Good deal -- that's why the instance initializer is getting run three times, since it runs each time an instance is created. Good luck on the certification! – T.J. Crowder Dec 2 '12 at 16:48
1  
@VictorSorokin - Since T.J. didn't include links, here they are for whomever want them. Instance initializers are described in §8.6 of the Java Language Specification and static initializers in JLS §8.7. – Ted Hopp Dec 2 '12 at 17:24
1  
@TedHopp: What I'd really like to find is something saying what you and I and Victor and Marko all know: That declarations happen before initializers are run, as part of the fundamental process of setting up the class. Those links are fine, but they don't say that. It's so incredibly implicit that I didn't have much luck finding it in the time I was willing to devote. :-) – T.J. Crowder Dec 2 '12 at 17:26

The static initializers are executed in the order in which they appear and the declarations aren't executed at all, that's how they got their name. This is why your code compiles without problems: the class structure is assembled at compile time from the declarations, and the static blocks are executed at runtime, long after all the declarations have been processed.

share|improve this answer
    
Well put. ..... – T.J. Crowder Dec 2 '12 at 17:23

As others have said, the place of declaration is generally inconsequential.

But sometimes it may cause confusions:

class Z {
    static int i = j + 2;  // what should be the value of j here?
    static int j = 4;
}

So Java does add some restrictions on forward reference: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-8.html#jls-8.3.2.3

Your example is allowed because the usage of the field is on the left hand side of an assignment. Apparently the language designers don't think it's too confusing. Nevertheless we should probably always avoid forward reference if we can.

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