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I found a solution to make a sprite move when you hold a key down. The problem is that it forces writing ugly duplicated code. The current solution I found is:

       for event in pygame.event.get():
            if event.type == KEYDOWN:
                keystate = pygame.key.get_pressed()
                while keystate[K_RIGHT]:
                    screen.fill((255,255,255))
                    pygame.event.get()

                    for sprite in sprites:
                        rimage = sprite[1].getimage()

                        if sprite[2] is None:
                            x+=3
                            sprite[1].update(time)
                            screen.blit(rimage, (x,y))
                            if sprite[1].isfinished() == True:
                                sprite[1].reset()
                            last_dir = "right"
                            if x >= screen_width - rimage.get_width():
                                x = screen_width - rimage.get_width()

                    #update player sprite movement
                    #update player sprite animation
                    #update rest of game map

                    keystate = pygame.key.get_pressed()
                    time = pygame.time.get_ticks()


                    pygame.display.update()

The problem is that the while keystate block. It has to be repeated for each direction and the game world needs to be updated in each while block. That is five places where the same code needs to be duplicated....4 directions plus if a key is not pressed. I could wrap it in a function but I was wondering if there was a better way to handle holding down a button in pygame.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The usual way program in pygame is use the events to update the direction, then write the update position code outside events, that way you don't need replicated code.

clock = pygame.time.Clock()

direction = (0,0)

while True:    # main loop

   for event in pygame.event.get():

        if event.type == KEYDOWN:
            if event.key == K_RIGHT:
                direction = (3, 0)
            elif event.key == K_LEFT:
                direction = (-3, 0)
            elif event.key == K_UP:
                direction = (0, 3)
            elif event.key == K_DOWN:
                direction = (0, -3)
            else:
                print "Unrecognized key"

        if event.type == KEYUP:
            direction = (0, 0)

    screen.fill((255,255,255))

    for sprite in sprites:
        rimage = sprite[1].getimage()

        if sprite[2] is None:

            # Check if new position is inside the screen
            new_pos = x + direction[0], y + direction[1]
            if new_pos[0] + rimage.get_width() < screen_width:
                x = new_pos[0]
            if new_pos[1] + rimage.get_height() < screen_height:
                y = new_pos[1]

            # Draw the sprite
            sprite[1].update(time)
            screen.blit(rimage, (x,y))
            if sprite[1].isfinished() == True:
                sprite[1].reset()
                last_dir = direction

    #update player sprite movement
    #update player sprite animation
    #update rest of game map

    time = pygame.time.get_ticks()

    pygame.display.update()

    clock.tick(40)  # Keep game running at 40 fps

If you want you can achieve the same with keystate, in such case you don't need to process key events.

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1  
You have forgotten the keyup to reset direction back to (0,0) –  Bartlomiej Lewandowski Dec 2 '12 at 18:22
    
You are absolutely right, updated. –  pmoleri Dec 2 '12 at 18:36
    
yea but I thought keystate is different then just detecting a single keypress. I am detecting the button being held down. That is why there is a loop while keystate: while the button is being held down record the direction? How do I know to exit the loop? Is the loop necessary? –  eat_a_lemon Dec 3 '12 at 14:00
    
I figured it out by using a combination of keydown and keyup events. –  eat_a_lemon Dec 3 '12 at 14:22

Pygame suggests or implies the division of programs into 3 parts:

The event handling, updating and drawing. As pmoleri already said, you simply change the direction of the movement. In the update function, you should pass in a delta time parameter, to move all the sprites according to the time passed. It is quite important, since the other technique doesn't take into account the variable speed of the processor. Games in DOS have been made this way, so now we need emulators to artificially slow down the processor. The draw part simply draws all the sprites.

This way you have a clear division between these 3 distinc parts in games: player input, game logic(movement, collision, actions etc.) and drawing.

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If you use clock.tick() you won't have the DOS problem. The problem you can have is if the program runs in a slow computer that can't keep up with the FPS you want. Either way the delta time is a good suggestion so you'll be able to change speed of game and FPS independently. The game logic / drawing separation is another good suggestion, there's more information about sprites in: www.pygame.org/docs/ –  pmoleri Dec 3 '12 at 13:55

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