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Is this the most efficient way of joining these 4 tables? Also is it possible to only have some rows of each tables selected? I tried changing * to a name of a column but only the columns from studentlist are allowed.

SELECT c.classID, c.instrument, c.grade, u.ID, u.firstname, u.lastname, u.lastsongplayed, u.title
FROM studentlist s
INNER JOIN classlist c ON s.listID = c.classID
INNER JOIN (

SELECT * 
FROM users u
INNER JOIN library l ON u.lastsongplayed = l.fileID
)

u ON s.studentID = u.ID
    WHERE teacherID =3
    ORDER BY classID
    LIMIT 0 , 30

Database structure:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `classlist` (
  `classID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `teacherID` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `instrument` text,
  `grade` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`classID`),
  KEY `teacherID_2` (`teacherID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=27 ;


CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `studentlist` (
  `listID` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `studentID` int(11) NOT NULL,
  KEY `teacherID` (`studentID`),
  KEY `studentID` (`studentID`),
  KEY `listID` (`listID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;


CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `users` (
  `ID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `email` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
  `password` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
  `firstname` text NOT NULL,
  `lastname` text NOT NULL,
  `sessionID` varchar(60) DEFAULT NULL,
  `lastlogin` time DEFAULT NULL,
  `registerdate` date NOT NULL,
  `isteacher` tinyint(1) DEFAULT NULL,
  `isstudent` tinyint(1) DEFAULT NULL,
  `iscomposer` tinyint(1) DEFAULT NULL,
  `lastsongplayed` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`),
  UNIQUE KEY `ID` (`ID`),
  UNIQUE KEY `email` (`email`,`sessionID`),
  KEY `ID_2` (`ID`),
  KEY `ID_3` (`ID`),
  KEY `lastsongplayed` (`lastsongplayed`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=63 ;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `library` (
  `fileID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `userID` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `uploaddate` datetime NOT NULL,
  `title` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
  `OrigComposer` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
  `composer` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
  `genre` varchar(60) DEFAULT NULL,
  `year` year(4) DEFAULT NULL,
  `arrangement` varchar(60) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`fileID`),
  KEY `userID` (`userID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=77 ;
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is this the most efficient way of joining these 3 tables?

Your JOIN looks correct and you are joining on your keys. So this should be efficient. However, I would encourage you to analyze your query with EXPLAIN to determine additional optimizations.

Is it possible to only have some rows of each tables selected?

Yes. Change * to be the columns from each table you want. I encourage you to explicitly prefix them with the originating table. Depending on the columns you select, this could also make your query more performant.

SELECT studentlist.studentID, users.email FROM ...
share|improve this answer
    
thx is it possible to group the result's together? I want to make a new div for every class and then show the students inside that class. – Thomas Dec 2 '12 at 16:58
    
i've added another inner join; is it still efficient? – Thomas Dec 2 '12 at 17:11
    
Rows, not columns. Select some rows of each table by using a derived table or by adding conditions to the JOIN clause. "The conditional_expr used with ON is any conditional expression of the form that can be used in a WHERE clause. Generally, you should use the ON clause for conditions that specify how to join tables, and the WHERE clause to restrict which rows you want in the result set." Read the EXPLAIN plan for those methods (derived table vs. conditions in the JOIN vs. conditions in the WHERE) before deciding which to keep. – Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Dec 2 '12 at 19:04

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