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I have a header file helper.h

class helper
{

public:
    static int someVal();   
};

int helper::someVal()
{
   return 999;
}

In my c class I call the someVal method as follows

#include "helper.h"
.
.
int answer = helper::someVal();

Is there way to have a call like this instead?

int answer = someVal();

Solution from below is helper.h --

static int someVal();   

 int someVal()
    {
        return 999;
    }
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not exactly, but you can make helper a namespace instead of a class:

namespace helper
{
    static int someVal();   
}

using namespace helper;
int answer = someVal();

You can define the function just as you did in the question. In practice is's often better to not use using namespace for your own functions because that makes it easier to understand which function is called.

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There is also the option of storing the static function address in a function pointer that has friendlier name. But it does seem more a more artificial solution than yours. +1. –  StoryTeller Dec 2 '12 at 17:33
    
Thanks, that works. But how does a call to printf (part of stdio.h) work without a using or doing something like stdio::printf ? –  tom Dec 2 '12 at 17:43
    
printf is not part of a class called stdio. This is not Java, functions need not live in a class. –  Johan Lundberg Dec 2 '12 at 17:49
1  
For the case of how it is done when including stdio.h, it's just as if you would have declared static int someVal(); without either a helper class or a helper namespace. –  Johan Lundberg Dec 2 '12 at 17:55
1  
There it is. Thank you. Been swithing between too many languages and didn't realise you could have methods not in a class. –  tom Dec 2 '12 at 17:57

If you only have a class with static functions, you could use a namespace with functions instead. You could later use using namespace to access the function without the namespace name.

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why should you want to? someone reading the code (even yourself in near future) is very happ not to misinterpret the function as global. when you do good naming on class and member function you would miss important information without class name. Factory::get_instance() carries more information than get_instance().

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