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I just wanted to know if it is possible to iterate over a sealed trait in Scala? If not, why is it not possible? Since the trait is sealed it should be possible no?

What I want to do is something like that:

sealed trait ResizedImageKey {

  /**
   * Get the dimensions to use on the resized image associated with this key
   */
  def getDimension(originalDimension: Dimension): Dimension

}

case class Dimension(width: Int,  height: Int)

case object Large extends ResizedImageKey {
  def getDimension(originalDimension: Dimension) = Dimension(1000,1000)
}

case object Medium extends ResizedImageKey{
  def getDimension(originalDimension: Dimension) = Dimension(500,500)
}

case object Small extends ResizedImageKey{
  def getDimension(originalDimension: Dimension) = Dimension(100,100)
}

What I want can be done in Java by giving an implementation to the enum values. Is there an equivalent in Scala?

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1  
Isn't this what you want? –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Dec 2 '12 at 17:32
    
thanks! Was trying to understand why i couldn't use the case objects ;) –  Sebastien Lorber Dec 2 '12 at 17:34
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3 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

This is actually in my opinion an appropriate use case for 2.10 macros: you want access to information that you know the compiler has, but isn't exposing, and macros give you a (reasonably) easy way to peek inside. See my answer here for a related (but now slightly out-of-date) example, or just use something like this:

import language.experimental.macros
import scala.reflect.macros.Context

object SealedExample {
  def values[A]: Set[A] = macro values_impl[A]

  def values_impl[A: c.WeakTypeTag](c: Context) = {
    import c.universe._

    val symbol = weakTypeOf[A].typeSymbol

    if (!symbol.isClass) c.abort(
      c.enclosingPosition,
      "Can only enumerate values of a sealed trait or class."
    ) else if (!symbol.asClass.isSealed) c.abort(
      c.enclosingPosition,
      "Can only enumerate values of a sealed trait or class."
    ) else {
      val children = symbol.asClass.knownDirectSubclasses.toList

      if (!children.forall(_.isModuleClass)) c.abort(
        c.enclosingPosition,
        "All children must be objects."
      ) else c.Expr[Set[A]] {
        def sourceModuleRef(sym: Symbol) = Ident(
          sym.asInstanceOf[
            scala.reflect.internal.Symbols#Symbol
          ].sourceModule.asInstanceOf[Symbol]
        )

        Apply(
          Select(
            reify(Set).tree,
            newTermName("apply")
          ),
          children.map(sourceModuleRef(_))
        )
      }
    }
  }
}

Now we can write the following:

scala> val keys: Set[ResizedImageKey] = SealedExample.values[ResizedImageKey]
keys: Set[ResizedImageKey] = Set(Large, Medium, Small)

And this is all perfectly safe—you'll get a compile-time error if you ask for values of a type that isn't sealed, has non-object children, etc.

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Nice :) It is not as easy as we do in Java but it will get the job done (when i'll use 2.10...) –  Sebastien Lorber Dec 2 '12 at 19:47
1  
Yes, Java's enum is arguably less of a train wreck than Scala's Enumeration, and is more convenient than sealed traits in this particular respect, but I'd still pick the Scala ADT-like approach over enum any day of the week. –  Travis Brown Dec 2 '12 at 20:16
    
I like the mixed paren formatting in the if-else. –  som-snytt Dec 3 '12 at 19:34
2  
Actually there's a bug in this macro as highlighted by stackoverflow.com/questions/18732362/…. Its last lines should be replaced with gist.github.com/xeno-by/6573434. –  Eugene Burmako Sep 15 '13 at 19:00
1  
Fixed (finally—my apologies for taking so long to notice the comment). Thanks, Eugene! –  Travis Brown Mar 11 at 22:09
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There's no capability for this natively. It wouldn't make sense in the more common case, where instead of case objects you had actual classes as subclass of your sealed trait. It looks like your case might be better handled by an enumeration

object ResizedImageKey extends Enumeration {
  type ResizedImageKey = Value
  val Small, Medium, Large = Value
  def getDimension(value:ResizedImageKey):Dimension = 
      value match{
         case Small => Dimension(100, 100)
         case Medium => Dimension(500, 500)
         case Large => Dimension(1000, 1000)

}

println(ResizedImageKey.values.mkString(",") //prints Small,Medium,Large

Alternatively, you could create an enumeration on your own, possibly placing it in the companion object for convenience

object ResizedImageKey{
  val values = Vector(Small, Medium, Large)
}

println(ResizedImageKey.values.mkString(",") //prints Small,Medium,Large
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. This is what i've done: creating a list of values –  Sebastien Lorber Dec 2 '12 at 19:47
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Something that can also solve the problem is the possibility to add an implicit convertion to add methods to the enum, instead of iteraring over the sealed trait.

object SharingPermission extends Enumeration {
  val READ = Value("READ")
  val WRITE = Value("WRITE")
  val MANAGE = Value("MANAGE")
}


/**
 * Permits to extend the enum definition and provide a mapping betweet SharingPermission and ActionType
 * @param permission
 */
class SharingPermissionExtended(permission: SharingPermission.Value) {

  val allowRead: Boolean = permission match {
    case SharingPermission.READ => true
    case SharingPermission.WRITE => true
    case SharingPermission.MANAGE => true
  }
  val allowWrite: Boolean = permission match {
    case SharingPermission.READ => false
    case SharingPermission.WRITE => true
    case SharingPermission.MANAGE => true
  }
  val allowManage: Boolean = permission match {
    case SharingPermission.READ => false
    case SharingPermission.WRITE => false
    case SharingPermission.MANAGE => true
  }

  def allowAction(actionType: ActionType.Value): Boolean = actionType match {
    case ActionType.READ => allowRead
    case ActionType.WRITE => allowWrite
    case ActionType.MANAGE => allowManage
  }

}

object SharingPermissionExtended {
  implicit def conversion(perm: SharingPermission.Value): SharingPermissionExtended = new SharingPermissionExtended(perm)
}
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