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I have the following code:

def call_block
  Proc.new.call
  my_local_proc = Proc.new { Proc.new.call }
  my_local_proc.call
end

call_block { p 'block' }

The output is:

block
block

Can someone explain to me how Proc.new found the block I passed to call_block? I guess that Proc.new just searches for the closest block and that it`s implemented entirely in C++.

And I have another question: Can something like this be achieve using only ruby? I mean, can I write a method such that, if not block has been given, takes the block that was passed to the method calling it. Something like:

def bar
  if not block_given?
    #use the block that has been given to the caller
  end
  # some code
end

def foo
  bar
end

foo { :block }
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Proc.new will use the method's block if called without one inside a method with one attached. This is documented behavior.

To find out how YARV does it, let's read the source code. Specifically, the proc_new function:

block_pointer = rb_vm_control_frame_block_ptr(control_frame_pointer);

This line retrieves a pointer to the block associated with the current control frame.

I believe these control frames implement Ruby's stack. We are currently inside the Proc.new control frame, so this would retrieve the pointer to the block given to the method.

if (block_pointer != NULL) {
    /* block found */
} else {
    /* block not found... */
}

If the pointer isn't NULL, then Proc.new was passed a block explicitly. What if the pointer is NULL, though?

/* block not found... */
control_frame_pointer = RUBY_VM_PREVIOUS_CONTROL_FRAME(control_frame_pointer);
block_pointer = rb_vm_control_frame_block_ptr(control_frame_pointer);

We move up on the stack and try to get its block. In other words, we move up to the caller's control frame and try to get its block.

if (block_pointer != NULL) {
    if (is_lambda) {
        rb_warn("tried to create Proc object without a block");
    }
} else {
    rb_raise(rb_eArgError, "tried to create Proc object without a block");
}

Now, if it's not NULL, then we pretty much succeeded. If it's still NULL, then we can't create a Proc, so we raise an ArgumentError.

The algorithm boils down to this:

  1. See if Proc.new was given a block
    1. If so, use it
    2. If not, see if caller was given a block
      1. If so, use it
      2. If not, raise error

Source code altered for readability. Visit linked source file on GitHub for the original.

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1  
Great answer and explanation! –  user931392 Dec 2 '12 at 21:40

If Proc.new called without a block, it takes the block passed to method(if any) and convert it into a proc object.

If you do not pass any block when you call foo, it will raise an ArgumentError exception, which is reasonable enough, cause block_given? returns false and you try to use Proc.new without a block.

As of second question, you can pass a proc through many methods by using & notation.

It will transform given block into a proc and you can pass it further:

def bar &proc
  proc.call
end

def foo &proc
  bar &proc
end

p foo { :block }
# => :block

also, bar method can be rewritten like this:

def bar
  yield if block_given?
end

yield will execute given block, so you do not need to explicitly transform it into a proc nor execute it via call

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From the manual.

Creates a new Proc object, bound to the current context. Proc::new may be called without a block only within a method with an attached block, in which case that block is converted to the Proc object.

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