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I am new to Java and was trying to understand how synchronizatioon works. So I created a Plane Reservation System and I am able to simulate mutliple users trying to make a reservation and use Synchromization to get the correct output.

Now that it works, I am thinking how this works in the real world. For instance, let us say the application is built on Swing and this is a multi user application. For simplicity let us assume there are only two planes 'AAA' and 'BBB'. This application may be installed in each of the ticket counter agent's computer , the kiosks at the airport and as well as in the computers of different travel agents and all of them accessing the same database.

In this case, each user/computer will have its own instance of Reserve class, Transaction class and Plane class. So there is only one thread/request in the Transaction class and there is no synchronization.

My question is, how will a mutli user application like this Reservation system actually be designed/implemeneted such that all users are accessing one instance of Transacion class so that synchronization can happen. You can also look at this question as, how can I build a mutli-user game played by different players across different computers. One more example would be a Banking system to make deposits, withdrawals and transfers when the application is running in the ATM as well as the Teller's machine.

///////////////////////////////

Reserve.java ---> Point of entry for each request made by a user

/////////////////////////////

import java.io.IOException;

public class Reserve {

static int queryseatsavailableinx;
static int queryseatsavailableiny;

static
{
    seats s = null;
    try {
        s = new seats();
    } catch (IOException e1) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e1.printStackTrace();
    }
    try {
        queryseatsavailableinx = s.getseatsinplanex("AAA");
        queryseatsavailableiny = s.getseatsinplanex("BBB");
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

static final Plane x1 = new Plane("AAA", 001, queryseatsavailableinx );
static final Plane y1 = new Plane("BBB", 002, queryseatsavailableiny);
static final Transaction trans = new Transaction();

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {

    Thread t1 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        public void run() {
            trans.getPlaneInfo(x1);
        }
    });

    Thread t2 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        public void run() {
            //trans.getPlaneInfo(x1);
            trans.reserveSeats(x1,3);
        }
    });

    Thread t3 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        public void run() {
            //trans.getPlaneInfo(y1);
            trans.reserveSeats(y1,8);
        }
    });

    Thread t4 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        public void run() {
            //trans.getPlaneInfo(x1);
            trans.reserveSeats(x1,2);
        }
    });

    t1.start();
    t2.start();
    t3.start();
    t4.start();

    t1.join();
    t2.join();
    t3.join();
    t4.join();
 }

}

///////////////////////////////

Transaction.java ---> Actual transaction happens here

/////////////////////////////

public class Transaction {

public void getPlaneInfo(Plane x){
    synchronized(this){
        int number =  x.getSeatCapacity();
        String planename=x.getPlaneName();
        System.out.printf("The number of seats in plane %s is %d\n",planename,number);
    }

}

public void reserveSeats(Plane x, int seatstobereserved) {
    synchronized(this){
    x.updateSeatCapacity(seatstobereserved);
    }
  }
 }

///////////////////////////////

Plane.java ---> Information about the plane

/////////////////////////////

final public class Plane {

private String planename = null;
private int planeid = 0;
private int availableseatcapacity = 0;

Plane(String planename, int planeid, int seatcapacity) {
    this.planename = planename;
    this.planeid = planeid;
    this.availableseatcapacity = seatcapacity;
}

public String getPlaneName() {
    return planename;
}

public int getPlaneId() {
    return planeid;
}

public int getSeatCapacity() {
    return availableseatcapacity;
}

public void updateSeatCapacity(int reservedseats) {
    availableseatcapacity -= reservedseats;
    System.out.printf("\n%d Seats successfully reserved and remaining seats " +
            "in the plane %s are %d\n",reservedseats, planename,availableseatcapacity);

 }

}

///////////////////////////////

Seats.java ---> To simulate each time a request is made by the user the 'number of availabe seats' is retrieved from a common datasource/db. /////////////////////////////

import java.io.DataInputStream;
import java.io.DataOutputStream;
import java.io.EOFException;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;

final public class seats {

seats() throws IOException {
    DataOutputStream di1 = new DataOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(
            "\\PlaneReservation\\bin\\a.bin"));
    DataOutputStream di2 = new DataOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(
            "\\PlaneReservation\\bin\\b.bin"));

    di1.writeInt(300);
    di2.writeInt(200);
    di1.flush();
    di2.flush();
    di1.close();
    di2.close();
}

public int getseatsinplanex(String s) throws IOException {
    if (s.equals("AAA")) {
        FileInputStream fis1 = new FileInputStream("\\PlaneReservation\\bin\\a.bin");
        DataInputStream dis1 = new DataInputStream(fis1);
        int number = 0;
        boolean eof = false;
        while (!eof) {
            try {
                number = dis1.readInt();
            //  System.out.println(number);
            } catch (EOFException eofx) {
                eof = true;
                dis1.close();
            }
        }
        return number;
    } else if (s.equals("BBB")) {
        FileInputStream fis2 = new FileInputStream("\\PlaneReservation\\bin\\b.bin");
        DataInputStream dis2 = new DataInputStream(fis2);
        int number = 0;
        boolean eof = false;
        while (!eof) {
            try {
                number = dis2.readInt();
                //System.out.println(number);
            } catch (EOFException eofx) {
                eof = true;
                dis2.close();
            }
        }
        return number;
    }
    return 0;
 }
}
share|improve this question
4  
sscce.org –  dantuch Dec 2 '12 at 18:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Symplistically, you'd make all Transactions methods synchronized: this would give you mutual exclusion.

In reality, however, no system is designed like that. The server-side application is not modelled as a single synchronized object. Rather, the durable state is maintained in a relational database that supports ACID transactions (atomic, concurrent, isolated, and durable) and the equivalent of the Transaction object is a stateless singleton object that needs no synchronization on Java level. Such an object would be called a service bean. It would typically be created within a Dependency Injection container, such as Spring, and it would be connected to a bunch of other objects, such as DAOs (Data Access Object), which would in turn implement the low-level logic of interaction with a database. The Dependency Injection container makes it easy to declaratively build a complex graph of interconnected objects. A typical enterprise application, such as an airline's reservation system, contains at least tens of service beans and even more DAOs, which connect to a variety of back-end systems.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not know Spring, so please pardon my naivette. So would this mean that user would get a service bean which would provide the requested transaction? And how would the service beans ensure they are all working with the correct data. For example: Three service beans are displaying 3 users that there are only last 5 seats available. And then, all 3 users simulatenously reserve that last 5 seats? –  user547453 Dec 2 '12 at 19:41
    
There's a variety of choice for the client-side API, one of them being a proxy bean that implements the service bean's interface (this is an option only if the client is also implemented in Java). As far as concurrency, the final outcome will always be consistent, with no overbooking: one client will get the tickets whereas the others will be notified that the tickets were sold under their nose. –  Marko Topolnik Dec 2 '12 at 19:50
    
Thanks Marko!!!! –  user547453 Dec 2 '12 at 19:53

Either

a) you rely in the database stored procedures (that ensure atomicity) to perform the operation.

b) you only have one instance (a server) that holds the critical section. The clients perform request to it, the server tells if there were seats available (operation succeeded) or there weren't (opertion failed).

Real world operative will be mostly b, which can use a.

share|improve this answer
2  
Anyway, dantuch is right. This question would be more suited for programmers.stackexchange.com, as it is not related to your code but more to a description/general idea. –  SJuan76 Dec 2 '12 at 19:03
1  
Thanks SJuan76...your answer really helped me to clarify the concept which is multi user applications 'need' to run in a distributed environment. When I was learning synchronization in Java, I came across examples like a chess game where 2 threads represent 2 players but the main point that I was missing was that the program was running on one computer and 2 users can play. So both the players are seeing the same data. –  user547453 Dec 2 '12 at 19:27

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