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I know some of the escape characters in Java, e.g.

\n : Newline
\r : Carriage return
\t : Tab
\\ : Backslash
...

Is there a complete list somewhere?

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5  
This is in the Java Language Spec – skaffman Sep 2 '09 at 12:13

You can find that here.

  • \t Insert a tab in the text at this point.
  • \b Insert a backspace in the text at this point.
  • \n Insert a newline in the text at this point.
  • \r Insert a carriage return in the text at this point.
  • \f Insert a formfeed in the text at this point.
  • \' Insert a single quote character in the text at this point.
  • \" Insert a double quote character in the text at this point.
  • \\ Insert a backslash character in the text at this point.
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13  
The list is missing Unicode and octal escapes: \u1234 \012 \01 \0 – Sampo Apr 30 '14 at 13:04
2  
    
It's also missing the bell character \a and the null character \0. – bvdb Mar 5 '15 at 13:30
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\a does not compile in javac 1.8.0_20: illegal escape character: String test = "\a"; – Ehryk Mar 15 '15 at 18:18
    
"Unicode escapes are pre-processed before the compiler is run." -- Mark Peters. So they are different from the standard String escapes listed here. Thanks Jan for the comment to this answer – Josiah Yoder Sep 23 '15 at 20:34
Java Escape Sequences:

\u{0000-FFFF}  /* Unicode [Basic Multilingual Plane only, see below] hex value 
                  does not handle unicode values higher than 0xFFFF (65535),
                  the high surrogate has to be separate: \uD852\uDF62
                  Four hex characters only (no variable width) */
\b             /* \u0008: backspace (BS) */
\t             /* \u0009: horizontal tab (HT) */
\n             /* \u000a: linefeed (LF) */
\f             /* \u000c: form feed (FF) */
\r             /* \u000d: carriage return (CR) */
\"             /* \u0022: double quote (") */
\'             /* \u0027: single quote (') */
\\             /* \u005c: backslash (\) */
\{0-377}       /* \u0000 to \u00ff: from octal value 
                  1 to 3 octal digits (variable width) */

The Basic Multilingual Plane is the unicode values from 0x0000 - 0xFFFF (0 - 65535). Additional planes can only be specified in Java by multiple characters: the egyptian heiroglyph A054 (laying down dude) is U+1303F / 𓀿 and would have to be broken into "\uD80C\uDC3F" (UTF-16) for Java strings. Some other languages support higher planes with "\U0001303F".

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The existing answer does not address unicode and octal escape sequences in Java. – Ehryk Mar 15 '15 at 18:29
1  
\u000a does not seem to work -> - invalid character constant see more here – Jan Mar 26 '15 at 11:02
1  
@Jan It is working, perhaps too well. Unlike, for example, \r and \n, unicode escapes are pre-processed before the compiler is run as the question you linked to specifies. As such, it's inserting a literal line feed into your code and failing because of it. However, the escape code is "working" as it was intended to work in the specification. – Ehryk Feb 16 at 18:26
    
Ahhhhhh!! Now I understand that! :D Thank you Ehryk. – Jan Feb 18 at 7:50

Yes, below is a link of docs.Oracle where you can find complete list of escape characters in Java.

Escape characters are always preceded with "\" and used to perform some specific task like go to next line etc.

For more Details on Escape Character Refer following link:

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/data/characters.html

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2  
This answer offers no more information than what has already been provided in the existing answers – Yvette Jun 19 '15 at 16:53

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