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I have created the following slideshow in javascript. But for some reason on the first slide through of images, the first image just moves off and the second image does the "sliding". Any help would be appreciated. I have included comments to help make the code more readable.

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>

<head>

<title></title>
<style type="text/css">
img.pic {
    position: absolute;
    height: 768px;
    width: 1024px;
}
html, body { 
    background-color:#3b3b35;
    width: 1024px;
    height: 768px;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    overflow:hidden;
}
</style>

</head> 

<body onload="startImages()">

<img class="pic" id="slide0" src="1.jpg" alt="pic1" />
<img class="pic" id="slide1" src="2.jpg" alt="pic2" />
<img class="pic" id="slide2" src="3.jpg" alt="pic3" />
<img class="pic" id="slide3" src="4.jpg" alt="pic4" />
<img class="pic" id="slide4" src="5.jpg" alt="pic5" />
<img class="pic" id="slide5" src="6.jpg" alt="pic6" />
<img class="pic" id="slide6" src="7.jpg" alt="pic7" />
<img class="pic" id="slide7" src="8.jpg" alt="pic8" />
<img class="pic" id="slide8" src="9.jpg" alt="pic9" />
<img class="pic" id="slide9" src="10.jpg" alt="pic10" />
<script type="text/javascript">
// Define the x start variable
var xstart = 0;

// Constructor for an image object:
function Image(obj, x) {
    this.object = obj;
    this.xpos = x;
}

// Image array
var Images = [];

// Sets up the images
function startImages() {
    for (var Imageamount = 0; Imageamount < 10; Imageamount++) {
        var Imgstore = document.getElementById("slide" + Imageamount);

        // Puts image in the array
        Images[Imageamount] = new Image(Imgstore, xstart);
        xstart = xstart - 1024;
    }
    // Controlls the delays
    setInterval(function () {
        var val = 0;
        var Interval = setInterval(function () {
            imSlide();
            val++;
            if (val == 16) clearInterval(Interval); // 16*64 = 1024, ie image size
        }, 30);
    }, 5000);
}

function imSlide() { // Controlls sliding
    for (var Slide = 0; Slide < Images.length; Slide++) {
        var image = Images[Slide];
        // Update + 64 to give a smooth slide. Updates 16 times so 16*64=1024

        var x = image.xpos + 64;
        // Move image from far right back to front of image stack
        if (x == 5120) {

            x = -5120;

        }
        // Store position back in array
        image.xpos = x;
        // Move the image
        image.object.style.left = x + "px";
    }
}

</script>

</body>
</html>
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It would be helpful to create a jsFiddle as a demo –  Rob Grzyb Dec 2 '12 at 21:23
    
Hopefully this is ok! jsfiddle.net/w9qQx You can just about see the problem im having with it! –  user1870992 Dec 2 '12 at 21:48
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason that your slide show skips on the first interval is because you aren't setting the image's position when you first create your Image objects; you're only setting a variable that you have named 'xpos'. This causes all your images to overlap each other and display the last image, #slide9, on top of the others on page load.

modify your Image object declaration to this:

function Image(obj, x) {
    this.object = obj;
    this.xpos = x;
    this.object.style.left = x + "px"; //<--- this is the new part
}

here is the jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/w9qQx/4/

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Legend! Thank you very much! –  user1870992 Dec 3 '12 at 13:49
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Seems to be fixed by a minor tidy-up

I was going to rework your markup and code to provide a solution, but just cleaning it up (a bit) seems to have resolved the issue, which I am pretty sure was that the viewer (you or I) was being forced to watch the images load into their default positions, and thus flash past the viewing portal (that's what my earlier rough fix fixed).

I was then going to go on to suggest that this kind of effect is better carried out using css animations and transitions, but for the quite frustrating browser compatibility problems those methods (still) entail.

However, the code below, which is basically still the same (but moved around a bit) seems to me to provide the experience you apparently desired. As for how I'd write it? Pretty much not at all like that, but there are many ways, and perhaps no ideals.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title></title>
        <style type="text/css">
            img.pic {
                position: absolute;
                height: 768px;
                width: 1024px;
            }
            html, body { 
                background-color:#3b3b35;
                width: 1024px;
                height: 768px;
                margin: 0;
                padding: 0;
                overflow:hidden;
            }
        </style>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var xstart = 0,
                images = [];
            function Image(obj, x) {
                this.object = obj;
                this.xpos = x;
            }
            function imSlide() {
                for (var slide = 0; slide < images.length; slide++) {
                    var image = images[slide],
                        x = image.xpos + 64;
                    if (x == 5120) {
                        x = -5120;
                    }
                    image.xpos = x;
                    image.object.style.left = x + "px";
                }
            }
            function startImages() {
                for (var imageamount = 0; imageamount < 10; imageamount++) {
                    var imgstore = document.getElementById("slide" + imageamount);    
                    images[imageamount] = new Image(imgstore, xstart);
                    xstart = xstart - 1024;
                }
                setInterval(function () {
                    var val = 0,
                    interval = setInterval( function () {
                        imSlide();
                        val++;
                        if (val === 16) {
                            clearInterval(interval);
                        }
                    }, 30);
                }, 5000);
            }
            self.onload = function () {
                startImages();
            }
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <img class="pic" id="slide0" src="ping.png" alt="pic1">
        <img class="pic" id="slide1" src="pong.png" alt="pic2">
        <img class="pic" id="slide2" src="ping.png" alt="pic3">
        <img class="pic" id="slide3" src="pong.png" alt="pic4">
        <img class="pic" id="slide4" src="ping.png" alt="pic5">
        <img class="pic" id="slide5" src="pong.png" alt="pic6">
        <img class="pic" id="slide6" src="ping.png" alt="pic7">
        <img class="pic" id="slide7" src="pong.png" alt="pic8">
        <img class="pic" id="slide8" src="ping.png" alt="pic9">
        <img class="pic" id="slide9" src="pong.png" alt="pic10">
    </body>
</html>

Please don't hesitate to let me know if the problem isn't as fixed as I thought it was, and I'll try again (this time by actually changing the code).

share|improve this answer
    
This was a quick semi-fix I'm leaving in place for continuity. –  Fred Gandt Dec 4 '12 at 20:20
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A complete revision

Although I see an answer has already been accepted, I see room for improvement especially as the accepted answer doesn't appear to fix the problem.

Even though the method I'm offering here is far from ideal, it does emulate the original whilst not suffering it's errors.

To speed up page loading we call for stylesheets and scripts as separate resources to be loaded asynchronously. I appreciate that the original poster may have already been doing that in the live version of the application, but it's worth mentioning just in case not.

A JSFIDDLE of this method.

The HTML5

I've added two divs to contain the images.

The outer of these nested divs can be positioned anywhere on the document and the div within it containing the images will follow along. This allows that the inner div can be set with

position: absolute;

allowing for the whole div to be moved sideways.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title></title>
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="slideshow.css">
        <script type="text/javascript" src="slideshow.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="screen">
            <div>
                <img class="pic" src="image1.png" alt="pic1">
                <img class="pic" src="image2.png" alt="pic2">
                <img class="pic" src="image3.png" alt="pic3">
                <img class="pic" src="image4.png" alt="pic4">
                <img class="pic" src="image5.png" alt="pic5">
                <img class="pic" src="image6.png" alt="pic6">
                <img class="pic" src="image7.png" alt="pic7">
                <img class="pic" src="image8.png" alt="pic8">
                <img class="pic" src="image9.png" alt="pic9">
                <img class="pic" src="image10.png" alt="pic10">
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

The CSS

Setting as many styles in an asynchronously downloaded stylesheet as possible is ultimately superior to setting styles in any other way.

The importance of setting the width of the inner div to allow space for the images it is due to contain is that, as the images are downloaded to the viewer, they will already be hidden by the parent div's border.

Note that the inner div is set to

position: absolute;

only after setting its parent to

position: relative;

For more info about why see w3schools css documentation.

Then I've set the images to

float: left;

so that they sit in a horizontal line, filling their parent div which has it's width set to the width of all the images combined.

Note: If the images have borders and/or margins and/or if their parent div has any padding, the accumulated extra width would need to be added to the total width of the image's parent div's width.

See that the images are set to

position: relative;

so they don't all slide up to one end of their parent.

html, body { 
    background-color: #3b3b35;
}
#screen {
    position: relative;
    width: 1024px;
    height: 768px;
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
    overflow: hidden;
}
#screen div {
    position: absolute;
    width: 10240;
    height: auto;
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
}
#screen div img.pic {
    position: relative;
    float: left;
    width: 1024px;
    height: auto;
    margin: 0px;
}

The JavaScript

Now for the business end.

Since the script should have been downloaded whilst the HTML DOM was loading, the script will be ready and waiting when the "onload" event is triggered.

I've set the first four variables to be easily editable if at any time later you decide slow it down or speed it up.

The script will read the HTML DOM to work out how many images there are, and set the width of their parent div. This is just in case you later wanted to add or remove images, but forget to edit the css. I haven't however made it smart enough to adapt to changes in image dimension.

Simply put, the script moves the images parent div to the left in steps by the ultimate width of one image, then takes the first image in the div and puts it at the end, and repeats until unloaded.

(function () {
    function startSlideshow(screen) {
        var imagewidth = 1024,          // width of images in pixels
            transitioneveryseconds = 5, // seconds each slide is still
            transitionseconds = 0.5,    // transition time in seconds
            framerate = 60,             // transition frames per second
            slidequantity = screen.getElementsByTagName("img").length,
            left = 0,
            slide = 0;
            screen.style.width = (slidequantity * imagewidth) + "px";
        transitionseconds *= 1000;
        transitioneveryseconds *= 1000;
        setInterval(function () {
            left = 0;
            slide = 0;
            while (slide++ < framerate) {
                setTimeout(function () {
                    screen.style.left = (left -= (imagewidth / framerate)) + "px";
                }, slide * (transitionseconds / framerate));
            }
            setTimeout(function () {
                screen.appendChild(screen.getElementsByTagName("img")[0]);
                screen.style.left = "0px";
            }, transitionseconds);
        }, transitioneveryseconds + transitionseconds);
    }
    self.onload = function () {
        startSlideshow(document.getElementById("screen").getElementsByTagName("div")[0]);
    }
}());
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