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Interface A and its implementation:

public interface A<K, E> {
    public void foo();
}

public abstract class AImpl<K, E> implements A<K, E> {
    public void foo(){};
}

Interface B, which extends interface A, and its implementation:

public interface B extends A<Integer, String> {
    public void bar();
}

public class BImpl extends AImpl<Integer, String> implements B {
    public void bar(){};
}

An abstract class C, which gets A injected:

public abstract class C<K, E> {
    A<K, E> a;

   @Inject
   public setA(A<K, E> a){
       this.a = a;
   }

   public A<K, E> getA(){
       return a;
   }
}

With Guice:

bind(new TypeLiteral<A<Integer, Book>>(){}).to(BImpl.class);

And the last class, which extends class C:

public class D extends C<Integer, String> {
   public void fooBar(){
        this.getA().bar(); //Gets BImpl injected by Guice, and call bar():  Not working - error
        ((B) this.getA()).bar(); //Working
   }
}

Like you can see from inline comments, BImpl gets properly injected and can be used, if it has no additional methods, that extends A (interface B is empty). If I add any new method in B, I can't call it in D without it casting to B. My main goal is, giving a user possibility to extend A and use this functionality in D.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I add any new method in B, I can't call it in D without it casting to B. My main goal is, giving a user possibility to extend A and use this functionality in D.

If the user needs the functionality provided by B but not A, they should declare that they need a B. Class D should declare what it needs - not rely on casting to make sure it was correctly configured beyond what was declared.

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